The “Baby Blues”

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mother-589730_640 “Baby blues” is the term used to describe the mood swings that the majority of women—approximately 85 percent—experience during the first two weeks or so after giving birth. The baby blues are considered a normal biological reaction to childbirth and tend to resolve rather quickly.

Although Post-Partum Depression and baby blues share many of the same symptoms, they are not identical. With the baby blues, symptoms such as weepiness and anxiety come and go and are interspersed with periods of happiness and contentedness. In contrast, Post-Partum Depression is a far more serious condition that involves negative symptoms and unrelenting feelings. Post-Partum Depression is also much more debilitating; with the baby blues, the new mother is still able to take care of  herself, her new baby, and any other children.

Symptoms of the baby blues include irritability, rapid mood swings, tearfulness, and anxiety, usually beginning about two days after delivery. They tend to be mild and last about two weeks, roughly until the woman’s hormones return to normal levels. The baby blues resolve relatively quickly, and no medication or therapy is needed. However, if the “normal” baby blues symptoms last longer than three weeks, get worse instead of better, or more serious symptoms like intrusive thoughts arise, it is possible that what started as the baby blues may now be a case of Post-Partum Depression.

Neuropsychiatrist Louann Brizendine points out that a negative aspect of breast feeding can be a lack of mental focus, or a feeling of being fuzzy and absentminded. The parts of the brain responsible for focus and concentration are preoccupied with protecting and tracking the newborn for the first six months or so after birth. Lack of sleep contributes to the mental fog, and a woman’s brain does not return to normal until six months post-partum.

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