A Bit Of A Twist

Posted on Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Have you given a thought to Valentine’s Day yet?  I suspect for most people it’s a last minute scramble for dinner reservations or roses.  The Valentine cards and candy in stores have been staring us in the face since Christmas Eve.  But most of us have had a few other things on our minds, things like floods, flu, holiday bills, and taxes.  Hearts and flowers aren’t top priorities for most folks unless they work for Hallmark or Russell Stover.

This year there’s a bit of a twist.  February 14th is Valentine’s Day and Ash Wednesday.  It’s most unusual.  As soon as I noticed this anomaly on the calendar, I realized several things would happen.  Some people would turn it into a theological controversy over which observance should take precedence.  I’ve always been perplexed by the propensity of some people to promote “either-or” thinking.  Sure enough, several prominent clerics have issued stern statements about the obligation of their members to fast and forego any Valentine treats.  That’s their call.

Some people will slog through the day unaware of either observance.  They don’t worry about philosophical or theological dilemmas, and, for the most part, they’re not terribly romantic or thoughtful to begin with.  No big deal.

I have a different take on this.  As a 63-year-old woman, I’ve had my share of lovely Valentine surprises and a few bitter disappointments.  That’s life.  As a geriatrician, I know how many sick, lonely, elderly people are ignored on Valentine’s Day.  That’s sad.  As a lifelong Catholic, I understand that Ash Wednesday is all about spiritual priorities and discipline.  We’re not supposed to be self-indulgent morning, noon, and night.  That’s prudent.

Here’s the good part:  Valentine’s Day and Ash Wednesday don’t have to be at odds with each another.  There is no need for “either-or” thinking.  St. Valentine was a real man, a priest who brought great kindness and love to persecuted people in third century Rome.  He was martyred for his devotion in 270 A.D.  Ash Wednesday is a major reminder that life is short.  The only thing we’ll take with us at the end is the love and compassion we have shown to others.

We all have patients, colleagues, neighbors, and even passing strangers in our lives who will be neglected on February 14th unless we remember them.  Valentine’s Day and Ash Wednesday.  Curious.  There’s never a need to “fast” from being thoughtful.

Stress: The Silent Stalker of the Heart

Posted on Posted in Continuing Education, Elder Care, Homestudy, Pain, Seminars, Webinars

heart-915562_640Despite the many advantages of today’s technological progress, chronic stress persists as a major problem. Stress is not only uncomfortable, it can cause major damage to the circulatory and immune systems, leading to hypertension, arrhythmias, increased coagulation, and atherosclerosis.

Stress also exacerbates coronary heart disease (CHD), myocardial infarction (MI), and heart failure. Various stressors have been found to raise the risk of heart disease and even increased mortality due to heart disease—especially chronic work-related stress, marital strain, bereavement, and social isolation. Acute emotional stress may trigger myocardial infarction and a phenomenon known as stress myocarditis.

Stress, by virtue of its effects on adrenaline release, triggers myocardial ischemia, promotes arrhythmogenesis, stimulates platelet function, and increases blood viscosity. In some individuals, the intrinsic effects of stress include exaggerated heart rates and blood pressure responses. Emotions that often come with stress, namely anger, hostility, anxiety, and depression, bring a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and cardiac events, and — in those with heart disease — poor prognosis.

Depression is related to greater risk for developing coronary heart disease (CHD), poor prognosis in CHD, and higher mortality in those with CHD. It is also associated with arrhythmias, higher risk of acute coronary syndrome, and poor prognosis after myocardial infarction.

Those who are depressed are less likely to make lifestyle changes important for heart health. Mood disorders such as depression and anxiety may also affect lipid metabolism. Twenty percent of individuals who have cardiovascular disease or a previous history of MI have been found to have major depressive disorder (MDD). Psychosocial stressors can be both a cause and a consequence of cardiovascular disease events. Stress management might reduce future cardiac events in patients with cardiovascular disease.

Unless medications are required, patients can often make lifestyle changes that markedly decrease chronic stress. Some recommended strategies include:

  1. exercising on a regular basis.
  2. meditating for one or two 20- to 30-minute sessions a day. Studies show meditation can have lasting effects on blood pressure and heart rate.
  3. taking a vacation or a long weekend off.
  4. writing about stressful events.
  5. participating in a support group.
  6. regularly doing deep breathing exercises.
  7. using progressive muscle relaxation, which reduces muscle tension by relaxing individual muscle groups.
  8. practicing yoga, tai chi, or qi gong, all forms of exercise and meditation that are effective in reducing stress.
  9. spending more time outdoors.
  10. disconnecting from electronics and social media.
  11. listening to soothing music or silence.
  12. engaging in creative endeavors or hobbies.

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