COVID-19: Complications

Posted Posted in Continuing Education, Elder Care, Homestudy, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

We knew this was coming, or at least we should have known. Several subsets of patients with complex reactions to COVID-19 (the disease from the coronavirus infection) are being recognized.  The very young, the very old, and the very sick may be predisposed to rare and intense immune responses to infection with this coronavirus.  Here is what we know so far:

  • “Cytokine Storm” can be a dire consequence of COVID-19 especially in older patients with several underlying illnesses.  Cytokines are polypeptides or proteins secreted by immune cells coming into contact with bacterial or viral antigens and/or endotoxins.  Cytokines can also be synthesized by adipose cells (one of the reasons overweight patients are at serious risk).  Cytokines include chemokines, interleukins, interferons, and tumor necrosis factors among others.  Simply put, cytokines influence the magnitude of an inflammatory immune response.  Multiple genetic factors seem to play a role.  Clinically, an older, chronically-ill patient with COVID-19 (or other infections, such as influenza) can deteriorate dramatically over 6-12 hours. Vital signs become unstable, O2 saturation drops, respiratory distress intensifies, and inflammatory markers like C-reactive protein rise.  Cardiac function is seriously compromised and liver, kidney, and neurologic function decline rapidly.  Severe clotting disorders may develop.

The outcome is poor, but aggressive efforts to suppress the massive autoimmune inflammatory response may help if initiated at the earliest stages.

  • Toxic Shock Syndrome:  This is an acute, serious, systemic illness triggered by a response to exotoxins produced by staph or strep bacteria. It was first noted in young women in the early 1980s and was linked to tampons, diaphragms, or contraceptive sponges left in the vagina.  It can occur after childbirth, abortion, or surgery.  Symptoms include a high fever, diffuse red rash resembling scalded or burned skin, hypotension and multi-organ system failure leading to shock.  Prompt and aggressive treatment involves removal of foreign bodies, debridement of incisions or wounds, IV fluids, and IV antibiotics (clindamycin and vancomycin).  IV immunoglobulin can be used.

Several patients in the New York area, who tested positive for COVID-19, have presented with symptoms similar to Toxic Shock Syndrome.

  • Kawasaki Disease:  This is a childhood illness with a dramatic presentation and complications related to vasculitis, probably of an autoimmune nature.  Each year in the U.S. there are between 3,000 to 5,000 cases, mostly in children under the age of five years.  Rare cases occur in young infants, teens, or young adults.  Occasional community clusters occur, especially in late winter and spring, without clear evidence of person-to-person transmission.  Diagnosis requires the presence of four out of five clinical findings after fever lasting five or more days.
    • Bilateral conjunctivitis — injection or intense redness without exudate, drainage, or crusting.
    • Mucocutaneous injection of the lips, tongue, and oral mucosa. Lips are red, raw, dry, cracked, and fissured.  The tongue is enlarged, red, and possibly tender.  The classic description is “strawberry tongue.”
    • Skin changes involving the hands and feet.  There is pronounced edema and erythema especially on the palms, soles, and nail beds.  Full-thickness desquamation or sloughing off of skin on the fingers, palms, soles, and toes leaves the underlying denuded skin red, raw, and tender. These changes typically begin around Day 10.
    • Polymorphous rash over the trunk may resemble measles, scarlet fever, hives, or erythema multiform.  The perineal area is often involved.
    • Cervical lymphadenopathy with at least one lymph node in the neck ≥ 1.5 cm in diameter.

The cardiac complications of Kawasaki Disease include coronary artery aneurysms, myocarditis, pericarditis, and valvular disease.  EKG and echocardiogram are indicated at the time of diagnosis and in regular follow-up visits for at least a year.  Treatment involves high-dose aspirin and IV immune globulin.  Approximately 85 children in the New York area who are COVID-19 positive are being evaluated for this condition, now called “Pediatric Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome.”

Cytokine storm, Toxic Shock Syndrome, and Kawasaki Disease are rare in their original forms or as complications of COVID-19.  The overwhelming majority (over 82 percent) of patients testing positive for COVID-19 remain asymptomatic or mildly ill.  The survival rate in the U.S. (rarely mentioned) is over 99.5%.

Those of us in health care must always be aware of unusual or rare complications of any illness.  But perspective is crucial, a concept lost on many in the realms of media and politics.  After all, the best way to control people is to keep them afraid.

Knowledge, perspective, and prudence:  not fun, but essential.

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COVID-19: Clinical Observations

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Elder Care, Homestudy, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Every new illness brings new knowledge. Global experience with COVID-19 is revealing patterns of clinical illness which will guide our approach to treatment. Here are some of those important observations:

  • The illness in 80% of people causes mild symptoms. Many people remain completely asymptomatic. Moderate and severe illness often has two phases. Days 1‒7 are characterized by fever (above 101° F), headache, significant cough, profound fatigue, myalgias, and malaise. Between days 4‒8 some patients have nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and/or diarrhea. Some patients lose their sense of taste and smell. Days 8‒21 are characterized (in 15‒20% of patients) by increasingly severe symptoms, including shortness of breath, dyspnea or difficulty breathing, chest pain or tightness, tachycardia and weakness.
  • The mean interval between onset of symptoms and hospitalization is 9.1‒12.5 days. This delay in the progression to serious illness may give us a window of opportunity for treatment.
  • Clinical findings typically include a low oxygen saturation level (O2 sat) on room air. This is a key finding and levels as low as 75‒90% are being seen (95‒100% is normal).
  • Laboratory results also show patterns similar to what was observed with SARS and MERS:

o   ↓ WBC or leukopenia

o   ↓ Platelet count or thrombocytopenia

o   ↑ Liver enzymes, especially LDH around hospital days 5‒8

o   CXR typically shows streaky opacities in both lungs consistent with an atypical pneumonia.

  • Serious complications of COVID-19 include severe viral pneumonia, ARDS (Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome) respiratory failure, cardiac injury including arrhythmias and CHF. Poor perfusion can lead to hepato-renal syndrome. Neurologic symptoms, delirium, and coma may occur.
  • There is evidence that intubation and mechanical ventilation may be causing more harm than good in some patients. One component of ventilator function, the PEEP setting (positive end-expiratory pressure) may be delivering pressures that are too high for the alveoli or air sacs in the lungs. It appears that some COVID-19 patients in respiratory distress actually need lower levels of PEEP (15‒20) as opposed to levels around 25. Some patients seem to need higher O2 concentrations delivered by face mask, CPAP or BiPAP, and not intubation and mechanical ventilation.
  • According to the CDC, two thirds of the patients who have died from COVID-19 (as of mid-April) had documented serious underlying conditions (heart disease, diabetes, asthma, renal disease, malignancy, immuno-compromise). Obesity has been a significant factor contributing to mortality. 1.9% of patients who have died had no known underlying condition.

We have only scratched the surface here. The next few weeks will reveal new insights about the illness itself and the best treatment protocols. In the meantime, do what is prudent to protect yourself and others. It may not be obvious to everyone, but tremendous progress is being made.

Blessings to all through Passover and Easter.

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19): Reason, Prudence and Common Sense

Posted Posted in Continuing Education, Elder Care, Homestudy, Nutrition, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

A pattern is emerging.  Clinical and laboratory experience in several countries reveals that there are two strains of coronavirus (COVID-19).  The virus is comprised of an unstable single strand of RNA that is mutating.  This is known as antigenic drift and it is expected.  Researchers have identified an “L” strain and an “S” strain.  At present, the “L” strain appears to be associated with more severe symptoms and a higher mortality rate.  More widespread and accessible testing (which is now underway) will help us discern which strain is prevalent in various regions.

The vast majority of deaths have occurred in elderly people with significant underlying illness.  The cluster of patients in a nursing home in Kirkland, Washington, underscores the fragility of sick, elderly patients in enclosed settings.  Outbreaks on cruise ships reflect a similar pattern of transmission.  A large percentage of cruise passengers are over 50.  People don’t like to think of 50 as older, but physiologically, it is.

Clinically, patients with more serious illness have a high fever (over 101°F), a deeper-sounding cough (not a tickle in the throat), and shortness of breath.  The mortality rate in countries with good health care is around one percent.  China and Iran are impossible to assess, but mortality rates there appear to be around 3.4 percent.  Older men in China have very high rates of smoking, which is a crucial factor in both morbidity and mortality.

For now, several additional practices make sense:

  • Minimize or restrict visitors to patients in hospitals and nursing homes. Sick, elderly people need to be protected.
  • Frequent, thorough hand-washing with soap and hot water for 20‒30 seconds is best; hand sanitizers are second best. Keep your hands moisturized to avoid cracked skin.
  • Don’t eat with your fingers; don’t lick your fingers.
  • Keep your hands away from your face, eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Sanitize your phone everyday. It’s the filthiest thing you touch.
  • Facial hair on men is a veritable Petri dish for microorganisms — especially among the nose, mouth, and chin. Now would be a good time to shave.
  • Change your pillow cases everyday.
  • Don’t waste your face masks. Surgical masks protect other people from your coughs and sneezes.  They don’t protect you from others.  Besides, many viruses penetrate our immune defenses through our eyes.
  • Toss your toothbrush at least every month, and whenever you are feeling ill.
  • Increase oral care with antiseptic mouthwash several times a day.
  • Stay well-hydrated to optimize the integrity of mucous membranes.
  • Let yourself and your patients get more sleep. Sleep is immensely important for multiple aspects of immune function.

The virus will evolve, and we will adapt.  At some point, it will resolve.  Right now, many people, especially those in the media, are overreacting.  That is always a mistake.  There has never been a substitute for reason, prudence, and common sense.  Steady as she goes.  How often can you say it?

 

Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19): Now What?

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Everybody calm down.  Fear is spreading faster than the coronavirus at this point.  Financial markets are in turmoil over fear of a global economic slowdown caused by the virus.  Worries about lost productivity in China, reduced demand for oil and consumer goods, and disruption of travel, tech, and financial sectors have investors around the world hyperventilating.  The price of gold has reached its highest level in seven years, and the yield on the 10-year treasury is near record lows (1.37%) — both signals of a flight to safety.  Caffeine-toxic media types are nearly histrionic.  As is typically the case, the only two things missing from their breathless banter are knowledge and perspective.

Here are the facts, as of Monday evening, February 24, 2020:

  • The number of global cases of COVID-19 is around 79,000.
  • Virus-related deaths are at 2,600.  The overwhelming majority of deaths is still in China, but China is only reporting in-hospital deaths.
  • The current mortality rate is still around 2–3%.  The mortality rate of SARS was 10% and the mortality rate of seasonal flu is 0.1%.
  • COVID-19 is more readily transmissible than SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), but less deadly.
  • The incubation period is still considered to be 14 days.
  • Viral transmission of COVID-19 appears to occur through large droplets in respiratory secretions.  Both oral and anal swabs have detected virus (viral particles can be found in the GI tract).
  • Both SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV infect intrapulmonary epithelial cells more than cells of the upper airways. As a result, transmission occurs mostly from patients with recognized illness and usually not from patients with minimal symptoms.  COVID-19 seems to work the same way.
  • The most serious symptoms involve the lower respiratory tract and lungs, as opposed to upper airways. The resulting disease is now called “novel coronavirus-infected pneumonia” or NCIP (NEJM, Feb. 20, 2020).
  • So far the clinical breakdown of cases is fairly predictable:
    • 80% are mild illness (requiring little or no care).
    • 14% are of moderate severity.
    • 5% are critical (requiring mechanical ventilation).
    • 2–3% are fatal.
  • U.S. cases – 35 (nearly all travel-related).
  • Italy confirms 152 cases around Milan with more than 200 cases throughout the country. South Korea confirms 833 cases after testing over 20,000 people.
  • The most vulnerable patients are older individuals and those with chronic underlying illness. (CAD, CHF, COPD, DM, chronic kidney disease).

So now what?  We wait for more facts.  The headlines will reflect a frustrating level of paranoia for another 2–3 months — at least.  Universal precautions in medical settings, careful personal hygiene, and common sense are always prudent. `

Don’t panic.  Don’t dump your investments.  Don’t overdo the caffeine.  And one more thing:  Everybody, please calm down.

 

Coronavirus – An Update

Posted Posted in Elder Care, Homestudy, Nutrition, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

It’s progressing. We knew it would.

The novel coronavirus, just renamed CoVID 19, has surpassed SARS in the number of deaths caused.

The number of confirmed cases worldwide is 60,081 with 1363 deaths. Nearly 99% of cases are still in China and the mortality rate remains around 2‒3%. There are undoubtedly far more unconfirmed cases in China since large numbers of people are at home with mild to moderate symptoms, or even asymptomatic infection. Inadequate testing to confirm the virus or rapidly triage and admit patients to intensive care in Chinese hospitals appears to be a serious problem.

The Chinese physician who first recognized an outbreak of SARS-like illness was targeted and arrested for “rumor-mongering.” He was even forced to recant his story. Dr. Li Wenliang contracted the coronavirus and died last week. Even his death was denied by authorities for a day. Dr. Li joins a brave, dedicated, compassionate group of heroic physicians throughout history who succumbed to the very illness they were treating. His memory will be honored.

The only way to solve a serious problem is to address it in an open, straightforward manner. Secrecy rarely solves serious problems. We’ve all heard the old dictum, “Sunlight is the best disinfectant.” Fortunately, the President’s task force on the coronavirus has done an excellent job of educating the public, securing and screening ports of entry, coordinating distribution of viral test kits to U.S. labs, evacuating Americans from China, and quarantining appropriate people with possible exposure.

The CDC, NIH, and Department of Health and Human Services personnel are working nonstop to contain the virus and develop a vaccine and potential treatment. In the meantime, supply chain disruption is affecting car companies, tech firms, and even medical supply businesses. Many of our OTC and prescription medications, including antibiotics, are made in China. The FDA has evacuated our personnel who inspect these production plants. There may well be consequences in the coming weeks and months here in the U.S.

Meanwhile, we’re in peak cold and flu season. Fastidious hygiene remains key:

  • Wash your hands – frequently and with soap and hot water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Do not touch your mouth, nose, and eyes. Viral particles suspended in respiratory droplets can penetrate mucous membranes and conjunctiva very easily.
  • Maintain at least 6 feet between yourself and others (social distancing)
  • Avoid crowds and unessential travel
  • Get more sleep than you think you need
  • Stay home if you have cold or flu symptoms (and don’t lay a guilt trip on colleagues who are sick)
  • Disinfect hard surfaces frequently. This coronavirus can apparently survive on hard surfaces as long as 9 days. Phones, keyboards, bathroom fixtures, door handles, and steering wheels are just a few examples.

Seasonal epidemics triggered by a mutated virus can be devastating, but eventually they are contained. Until then, our job is to stay calm, stay informed, and practice the time-tested principles of good patient care and common sense.

Morals, Manners and Mindsets

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Elder Care, Homestudy, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Our culture appears to be in free fall.  Movie moguls assault young women.  Campus doctors exploit and molest patients.  Gymnastics coaches and doctors engage in appalling sexual crimes.  The abuse of women and children has occurred for millennia. However, as individuals and as a civilization, we’re supposed to be advancing.

The human person, the human body, must be treated with dignity and respect at all times, at every stage of life.  The notion that we can do whatever we want, whenever we want is wrong.  It always has been, it always will be.

Professional stature is non-existent without self-restraint and honor.  And those in leadership positions who merely look the other way bear just as much guilt as the perpetrators.  It’s shocking to realize how much disgraceful behavior is tolerated out of ineptitude, laziness, greed, or complacency.  Virtually every sector of our society is at fault here.  Until we reach a critical mass of people willing to challenge this horrid behavior, nothing will change.

In our professional realm, there are a few things we can do to restore respectfulness:

  • Call patients or clients by their proper names: , Mrs., Mr., Dr., Reverend, Judge, etc. are all appropriate until someone invites familiarity.  Using first names with a new patient is not “friendly” as we have been led to believe.  It merely signals a sloppy level of unearned familiarity and unprofessional demeanor.  A medical or dental office is not a nail salon.
  • Male professionals should not be alone in an examination room with a female patient. The “expense,” “inefficiency,” or “inconvenience” of having a nurse or assistant present is an unacceptable excuse for this breach of protocol.
  • Manners matter. “Old school” nurses and doctors were taught to ask the patient’s permission before we touched him or her.  “May I listen to your heart?”, “May I examine your abdomen?”  No doubt some youngsters in health care would roll their eyes at this.  But we should never make assumptions about touching anyone (apart from emergencies), and yet it happens routinely today.
  • It’s good to remind ourselves, our colleagues, and our students that decorum and propriety are not old-fashioned and unnecessary. On the contrary, they are critically important, and their absence is palpable.

Morals, manners, and mindsets do not exist in a vacuum.  When someone is disrespectful or unethical in one domain, that vice will eventually metastasize.  Regardless of our age, culture, or profession, we should always try to treat others the way we’d like to be treated.  It’s not corny.  It’s not outdated.  It’s our only path forward.

A Very Long Reception Line

Posted Posted in Continuing Education, Elder Care, Homestudy, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

He was a bright light shining in the darkness.  Billy Graham changed the lives of hundreds of millions of people.  His message was simple and consistent:  God loves you.  He wasn’t concerned about denomination or fine points of theology even though he knew the Bible about as well as anyone.  He was a bold but humble force for good in the world.

In an age when being snide and snarky is considered “cool,” Billy Graham’s sincerity, honor, and compassion provided a beacon of hope.  Today, few things come more easily than cynicism.  I struggle with it every hour of the day.  But Billy Graham managed to rise above that temptation throughout his long life.  He never worried that someone might ridicule, criticize, or dismiss him because he never worried about himself.  Few people manage to subdue their egos the way Billy Graham did.  His lifelong focus was to share God’s love with as many people as possible.

Living a faith-filled life is very difficult.  Mother Teresa understood that. Pope John Paul II knew it.  Brave souls like these never agonize over focus groups, polls, or surveys.  Political correctness and fence-straddling, psycho-babble have no place in their lives.  They really do answer to a Higher Power.

Billy Graham gave spiritual counsel to 12 presidents regardless of their political party or religious affiliation.  He didn’t need to play games, massage egos, or create clever sound bites.  He said what he meant and he meant what he said. He had a clear understanding of right and wrong, and he wasn’t embarrassed by it.

Status had no claim on him. He lived a simple, scandal-free life.  For decades he showed as much attention and kindness to orphans in huts as he did to heads of state in palaces.

Finally, Billy Graham gave us all a noble example of how to endure the ravages of illness and old age with grace and dignity.  As we have seen with other saintly individuals, his patience, courage, and good humor endured until the very end. Protracted illness, pain, and suffering could not conquer the Spirit that worked within him.

I’ve heard it said that when you die, all the souls you’ve helped along the way are there in heaven to greet you.  In Billy Graham’s case, it must have been a very long reception line.

Arthritis and Diet

Posted Posted in Continuing Education, Elder Care, Homestudy, Pain, Seminars, Webinars

older-black-woman-rubbing-her-hands-arthritisThere are more than 100 different types of arthritis, and, therefore, no single diet will work for every person with arthritis.  However, studies have found that green tea, green leafy vegetables, dried plums, and kiwi fruit are all vitamin-rich and have powerful antioxidant properties.  Diets which include large quantities of fruits and cruciferous vegetables have been shown to have a beneficial effect on preventing the development of rheumatoid arthritis.  In addition, it is clear that carrying extra weight can put significant stress on the joints, and even a small reduction in weight can have an effect on the severity of arthritis symptoms.  Studies have shown that losing weight can significantly ameliorate the effects of osteoarthritis.  Significant weight gain prior to age 35 — as well as excessive alcohol consumption — has been linked to the development of gout.

Other contributing factors are certain foods and nutritional supplements (vitamins, minerals, and omega-3 fatty acids) which may play a role in preventing and reducing symptoms in some types of arthritis, such as gout, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and reactive arthritis.  Fish oil, particularly when ingested in conjunction with a diet low in arachidonic acid, reduces inflammation in some patients with rheumatoid arthritis.   Regular intake of fish has been shown to have a beneficial effect.  Consumption of excessive dietary fat, however, appears to exacerbate arthritis symptoms.

WEIGHT LOSS AND THE ARTHRITIS PATIENT

Weight loss for overweight arthritis patients is very important for several reasons.  First, as mentioned previously, loss of even a few pounds can significantly reduce stress on weight-bearing joints.   Research demonstrates that exercise and combined weight loss — as well as exercise regimens — result in decreased pain and disability and increased performance levels in patients with osteoarthritis.  Biomechanical data suggest that exercise in combination with diet may also result in improved gait when compared with exercise alone. Secondly, patients of all ages who have arthritis are much healthier, have an improved sense of well-being, and are less likely to suffer arthritis-related depression when they follow a nutritious, well-balanced diet.  The Arthritis Foundation recommends following a balanced diet that includes plenty of fruit, vegetables, and whole-grain products, while limiting consumption of sugar, salt, and saturated fat (i.e., a diet low in fat, high in fiber, and low in sugar).

By Mary O’Brien, MD

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Food, Calcium, and Bone Health

Posted Posted in Continuing Education, Elder Care, Homestudy, Nutrition

CalciumFoods_ML1512_ts481492527By Barbara Boughton

Once a woman hits menopause, getting enough calcium for bone health becomes a major concern. Women over age 60 are prone to osteoporosis — and the spinal, hip, and knee fractures that osteoporosis can bring. Yet adequate dietary calcium can help protect people from osteoporosis.  Taking calcium supplements can help as well.

It’s not just menopausal women who should be concerned about getting enough calcium. As consumption of sugary soft drinks has risen among children and teenagers, intake of milk has also declined. But children and teenagers who are able to eat and drink enough calcium-enriched foods—as well as take in sufficient protein during meals—benefit from improved skeletal growth and bone mass. In fact, studies show that children who avoid, for prolonged periods, drinking calcium-containing milk have an almost three-fold higher risk for fracture than age-matched birth cohorts.

Dairy products are considered to be the easiest and cheapest sources of dietary calcium. Most people should have three to four servings of milk products daily in order to improve bone health and prevent osteoporosis. Studies have estimated that increasing dairy intake to three to four servings per day can reduce osteoporosis-related healthcare costs in the U.S. by $3.5 billion per year.

As well as calcium, it’s important to get enough calcium to enhance calcium absorption. What are your calcium and vitamin D requirements? Adults up to age 50 should get 1,000 mg of calcium and 200 International Units (IUs) of Vitamin D. Those over age 50, should intake at least 1,200 mg of calcium and 400 to 600 IUs of vitamin D each day.

Among foods with calcium, some are better than others for bone health. Yogurt is one of the best. It contains a hefty dose of calcium (415 mg per serving of plain, low-fat or non-fat per eight-ounce serving).  Many varieties of yogurt are also fortified with vitamin D. Some brands of fat-free, plain yogurt contain 30 percent of the adult daily requirements for calcium and 20 percent of the adult daily requirements for vitamin D. Although protein-packed Greek yogurts are popular right now—because of their reputed health benefits—they are less useful than other yogurt types for staving off osteoporosis. Greek yogurts contain less calcium than other types of yogurt and very little vitamin D.

Besides dairy products — such as low-fat and non-fat milk, yogurt, and cheese — there are other foods that are good for your bones. Canned sardines and salmon are rich sources of calcium, and fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel, tuna, and sardines are also replete with vitamin D. Some vegetables contain a generous amount of calcium, including collard greens, turnip greens, kale, okra, Chinese cabbage, dandelion greens, mustard greens, and broccoli. Foods fortified with calcium and vitamin D—such as some juices, breakfast foods, soy milk, rice milk, cereals, and breads—can also add to the health of your bones.

The foods with the highest amounts of calcium are:  plain low-fat yogurt; calcium-fortified orange juice; low-fat fruit yogurt; skim mozzarella cheese and cheddar cheese; canned sardines; reduced and nonfat milk; tofu made with calcium sulfate; fortified breakfast drinks; and calcium-fortified cereals. Vegetables that are the richest sources of calcium include turnip greens, kale, and Chinese cabbage. For those who are lactose-intolerant, eight ounces of calcium-fortified soy milk can have from 80 mg to 500 mg of calcium.  Rice and almond calcium-fortified beverages can be good sources of calcium, too. To find out how much calcium is in these drinks, check the nutrition label on the back of these products at the grocery store.

If you want to eat for bone health, there are also some foods you should avoid. Heavy alcohol drinking (more than two drinks per day) can lead to bone loss, as can drinking more than three cups of coffee per day. Drinks high in caffeine, including coffee, tea, and caffeinated soft drinks, decrease calcium absorption and contributes to bone loss. Sodas also make it harder for the body to absorb calcium. Salty foods cause your body to lose calcium, too. To reduce the sodium in your diet, limit processed foods, canned foods, and salt added to the foods you eat each day. Aim for 2,400 mg or fewer mg of sodium per day.

Although beans contain calcium, they also are high in substances called phytates that interfere with your ability to absorb calcium. To reduce the phytate level in beans, soak them in water for several hours and cook them in fresh water. Wheat bran also contain high levels of phytates, which prevent your body from absorbing calcium. The phytates in wheat bran not only prevent the absorption of calcium in wheat bran but also prevent the absorption of calcium in foods eaten at the same time. For example, if you have milk and 100 percent wheat bran cereal together, your body can absorb some, but not all, of the calcium from the milk. The wheat bran in other foods like breads, however, is much less concentrated and unlikely to have a noticeable impact on calcium absorption.

Some vegetables with calcium can also contain ingredients called oxalates. Oxalates make it more difficult for you to absorb the calcium in vegetables. Foods with both calcium and oxalates include spinach, rhubarb, and beet greens.

As you can see, getting the right kind of calcium and the right amount of calcium from foods are not a simple matter. Yet it’s well worth the effort, since it will improve your bone health and strength—and may reduce your need for supplements.

  1. Food and Your Bones. Fact sheet. National Osteoporosis Foundation.
  2. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Calcium. National Institutes of Health.
  3. Calcium: An Important Nutrient that Builds Bones. Fact Sheet. Osteoporosis Canada.
  4. Calcium, Nutrition and Bone Health. Fact Sheet. American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. aaos.org.
  5. Rizzoli, R. Dairy products, yogurts and bone health. Am J Clin. 2014; 99 (suppl): 1256S-62S.

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Stress: The Silent Stalker of the Heart

Posted Posted in Continuing Education, Elder Care, Homestudy, Pain, Seminars, Webinars

heart-915562_640Despite the many advantages of today’s technological progress, chronic stress persists as a major problem. Stress is not only uncomfortable, it can cause major damage to the circulatory and immune systems, leading to hypertension, arrhythmias, increased coagulation, and atherosclerosis.

Stress also exacerbates coronary heart disease (CHD), myocardial infarction (MI), and heart failure. Various stressors have been found to raise the risk of heart disease and even increased mortality due to heart disease—especially chronic work-related stress, marital strain, bereavement, and social isolation. Acute emotional stress may trigger myocardial infarction and a phenomenon known as stress myocarditis.

Stress, by virtue of its effects on adrenaline release, triggers myocardial ischemia, promotes arrhythmogenesis, stimulates platelet function, and increases blood viscosity. In some individuals, the intrinsic effects of stress include exaggerated heart rates and blood pressure responses. Emotions that often come with stress, namely anger, hostility, anxiety, and depression, bring a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and cardiac events, and — in those with heart disease — poor prognosis.

Depression is related to greater risk for developing coronary heart disease (CHD), poor prognosis in CHD, and higher mortality in those with CHD. It is also associated with arrhythmias, higher risk of acute coronary syndrome, and poor prognosis after myocardial infarction.

Those who are depressed are less likely to make lifestyle changes important for heart health. Mood disorders such as depression and anxiety may also affect lipid metabolism. Twenty percent of individuals who have cardiovascular disease or a previous history of MI have been found to have major depressive disorder (MDD). Psychosocial stressors can be both a cause and a consequence of cardiovascular disease events. Stress management might reduce future cardiac events in patients with cardiovascular disease.

Unless medications are required, patients can often make lifestyle changes that markedly decrease chronic stress. Some recommended strategies include:

  1. exercising on a regular basis.
  2. meditating for one or two 20- to 30-minute sessions a day. Studies show meditation can have lasting effects on blood pressure and heart rate.
  3. taking a vacation or a long weekend off.
  4. writing about stressful events.
  5. participating in a support group.
  6. regularly doing deep breathing exercises.
  7. using progressive muscle relaxation, which reduces muscle tension by relaxing individual muscle groups.
  8. practicing yoga, tai chi, or qi gong, all forms of exercise and meditation that are effective in reducing stress.
  9. spending more time outdoors.
  10. disconnecting from electronics and social media.
  11. listening to soothing music or silence.
  12. engaging in creative endeavors or hobbies.

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