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Passport to Health? Maybe not…

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

“It relieves headaches, insomnia, anxiety, depression, arthritis, fibromyalgia, and pain of all kinds.” Sounds great. Unfortunately, this is merely an excerpt from an ad for CBD oil. CBD stands for cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive molecule that has some documented anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anxiolytic properties. CBD products and stores are popping up all over the country. Even the business networks are covering possible investment opportunities. CBD products now include teas, tinctures, topical creams, pills, oral solutions, sprays, candies, cookies, gummies, chocolates, and Italian ice. No kidding.

The vast majority of studies on CBD are preclinical, animal studies (mostly rats). Trying to extrapolate research findings from rats to humans is not medically sound. It can also be downright dangerous. But many people have a stunning ability to believe what they want to believe.

We live in an age of narrative. The narrative about far too many topics is carefully crafted by self-proclaimed elites in the media, the entertainment industry, the political realm, and the academic world. Money is a critical factor in forming a narrative, but equally vital is the perception of being “cool.” Being perceived as “cool” is of the utmost importance to a staggering number of people. The really “cool” people don’t even realize they’re cool because they’re too busy pursuing truth and genuine accomplishment.

When it comes to a fad like CBD, the prudent people are open-minded but cautious. Centuries of experience in numerous cultures should have taught us something about con-artists and snake oil. Some of our grandmothers were certain that a dose of castor oil every week would cure anything. Millions of people in Asia still believe the rhinoceros horn can heal everything from impotence to cancer. And despite all our science, people still spend ridiculous sums of money on ground apricot pits and crystals in place of chemotherapy.

The actual pharmacologic effects of CBD products are still being evaluated. Standardization, purity of product, dosing, absorption, bioavailability, half-life, potential contraindications, adverse effects, and drug-drug interactions need to be elucidated -– in people, not rats.

Until then, be careful. Snake oil salesmen abound, and they’ll probably seem really “cool.” Buyer beware. CBD Italian ice is likely not your passport to health.

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