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Memorial Day, D-Day and Cicero

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Traffic Delays.  Slow Wi-Fi.  Dead phone batteries.  Forgetting a password.  Insufficient “likes.”  These are among the top stressors listed by millennials in a recent survey.  Contrast this with the real stresses endured by similarly aged men storming the beaches of Normandy in World War II and the absurdity of current culture becomes painful.

I’ve always been baffled by the number of people who confuse Memorial Day and Labor Day.  They’re not even embarrassed.  Ask nearly anyone much under the age of 50 what he knows about June 6, 1944, and prepare for a blank stare.  Twenty- and thirty-somethings may well scrunch up their faces in annoyed perplexity as only they can do.  People today lead frenetic, cluttered lives that leave little room for history.  But as Cicero wrote in 46 B.C., “To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born is to remain always a child.”

Memorial Day commemorates those who died in active military service.  Originally, it was called Decoration Day and was observed on May 30th.  Eventually, it was changed to the last Monday in May mostly as an excuse for another three-day holiday weekend.  This year Memorial Day falls on May 27th.  People will have barbecues, picnics, and parades. They will open neighborhood swimming pools and proclaim the unofficial start of summer.  A few thoughtful people will attend memorial services and place flowers on the graves of those who sacrificed all.  But millions will remain clueless as they consume hot dogs and beer.

This year, on June 6th, those of us fortunate enough to live in the free world will observe the 75th anniversary of D-Day (June 6, 1944).  The planning, hope, courage, determination, perseverance, and sacrifice of the Allied Forces on that momentous day cannot be overstated.  The unwavering commitment of thousands of men to stopping the onslaught of the Nazis despite the terror, horror, and agony of it all is beyond our grasp.  What those men endured makes our worries laughable.

The next time you find yourself upset by traffic delays, slow Wi-Fi, or a dead phone battery, remember Memorial Day, D-Day, and Cicero.  Some of us need to stop thinking like children.