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Guidance and A Good Example

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Do you teach students? Do you manage employees? Are you setting a good example for those who will come after you? Last week, I heard Jamie Dimon, the chief executive of J.P. Morgan, discuss the importance of cultivating a bench of good people from which the board of directors could select a worthy successor. A truly wise leader in any organization thinks like that. Of course, in order to think and plan on that level, one needs tremendous maturity, discipline, humility, and prudence.

Many people today are too insecure and self-obsessed to train their own replacements. They’re more worried about who might threaten their power and position. But history is a good teacher. Socrates trained Plato, and Plato trained Aristotle. Jesus picked 12 apostles and numerous disciples. Sir William Osler trained an elite cadre of young physicians to follow in his footsteps at Johns Hopkins.

Superior leaders surround themselves with first-rate people, and these leaders cultivate several key attributes and skills. Whether you are a senior partner, a professor, or a parent, here are some of the qualities that are essential to your ultimate success as you pass the baton:

  • A deeply ingrained sense of right and wrong. Many people focus on what they can get away with. Moral relativism is not the secret to greatness or even long-lasting success.
  • A willingness to accept personal responsibility for success or failure. Expressions like “It’s not my fault,” “It’s not my job,” do not make for an acceptable mindset.
  • The ability to speak and act with courage. This one is tough in the age of social media nonsense and nastiness. The vast majority of people in board rooms and conference halls are afraid of what someone might say, so they hide behind the commonplace and comfortable. There is no honor in cowardice.
  • The wisdom to encourage and inspire others. Mediocre-management types make excuses. Top notch people bring out the best in others. When you have a great parent, teacher, coach, or boss, you can’t bear the thought of disappointing your hero.
  • The capacity to engage in independent thought and creative problem solving. The world is full of lemmings, parrots, copycats, and complainers. It takes a secure, confident leader to inspire real leadership in others.

Whether you work in a huge medical center, a small office, a corner pharmacy, or at home, someone is looking to you for guidance and a good example. Don’t be afraid to set the bar high.