COVID-19: The Whole Goal

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Nutrition, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

What is guiding your life right now?  Is it notions and emotions fueled by the media?  Is it political correctness and group-think?  Is it fear of ridicule, criticism, or worse?  What we do, what we avoid, and what we fear speak volumes.  Malevolent forces are at work in our culture, and the whole goal is control.

Sadly, far too many people in health care have become passive, dutiful sheep.  “I’m just doing what they tell me to do” has become a veritable mantra.  Nurses, doctors, dentists, and pharmacists who should be capable of independent thought and logic now lower their gaze and comply with idiocy.  It’s embarrassing.

This week (in August 2020), the CDC (Center for Disease Control), in usual fashion, issued a statement contradicting previous communications:  Patients without symptoms do not need to be tested.  Anyone with modest medical knowledge and a three-digit IQ should realize that.  Asymptomatic people, with rare exceptions, are not the problem.

Once again, we don’t have people line up in cars to be tested for flu, strep throat, tuberculosis, mono, or hepatitis because they feel like it.  We have wasted an obscene amount of money, time, and effort on unnecessary and often unreliable testing.  Ah, but it makes us feel as if we’re doing something, and it fuels the fear and paranoia.  Clearly, fear and paranoia make control so much easier.  What could be better?  Put on your mask and spray some Lysol — if you can find any.

There is no clear evidence anywhere in the world that lockdowns mitigate anything.  Viral epidemics run their course regardless of the interventions.  Many people in politics, education, and even health care have trouble with that reality.

We didn’t shut down the country during World War I and the Spanish Flu epidemic. We didn’t shut down business, travel, and education because of tuberculosis, yellow fever, whooping cough, polio, or the Hong Kong flu of 1969.  But back then, we didn’t have ignorant, malicious people pushing an agenda on cable TV and the internet.  We weren’t suffocated by pretentious bureaucrats issuing irrational edicts.  Sensible people would have laughed at such nonsense.

When a brand new illness develops, there are no “experts.” Guidelines will never take the place of facts, logic, and common sense.  Notions and emotions will never solve problems or save lives.  Group think and political correctness will never spark creativity or innovation.

We need to stop the passive, dutiful sheep routine.  The choices we make out of fear are almost always wrong.  Remember, the whole goal is control.  Just say no to the nonsense.

Coronavirus (COVID-19): Reason, Prudence and Common Sense

Posted Posted in Continuing Education, Elder Care, Homestudy, Nutrition, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

A pattern is emerging.  Clinical and laboratory experience in several countries reveals that there are two strains of coronavirus (COVID-19).  The virus is comprised of an unstable single strand of RNA that is mutating.  This is known as antigenic drift and it is expected.  Researchers have identified an “L” strain and an “S” strain.  At present, the “L” strain appears to be associated with more severe symptoms and a higher mortality rate.  More widespread and accessible testing (which is now underway) will help us discern which strain is prevalent in various regions.

The vast majority of deaths have occurred in elderly people with significant underlying illness.  The cluster of patients in a nursing home in Kirkland, Washington, underscores the fragility of sick, elderly patients in enclosed settings.  Outbreaks on cruise ships reflect a similar pattern of transmission.  A large percentage of cruise passengers are over 50.  People don’t like to think of 50 as older, but physiologically, it is.

Clinically, patients with more serious illness have a high fever (over 101°F), a deeper-sounding cough (not a tickle in the throat), and shortness of breath.  The mortality rate in countries with good health care is around one percent.  China and Iran are impossible to assess, but mortality rates there appear to be around 3.4 percent.  Older men in China have very high rates of smoking, which is a crucial factor in both morbidity and mortality.

For now, several additional practices make sense:

  • Minimize or restrict visitors to patients in hospitals and nursing homes. Sick, elderly people need to be protected.
  • Frequent, thorough hand-washing with soap and hot water for 20‒30 seconds is best; hand sanitizers are second best. Keep your hands moisturized to avoid cracked skin.
  • Don’t eat with your fingers; don’t lick your fingers.
  • Keep your hands away from your face, eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Sanitize your phone everyday. It’s the filthiest thing you touch.
  • Facial hair on men is a veritable Petri dish for microorganisms — especially among the nose, mouth, and chin. Now would be a good time to shave.
  • Change your pillow cases everyday.
  • Don’t waste your face masks. Surgical masks protect other people from your coughs and sneezes.  They don’t protect you from others.  Besides, many viruses penetrate our immune defenses through our eyes.
  • Toss your toothbrush at least every month, and whenever you are feeling ill.
  • Increase oral care with antiseptic mouthwash several times a day.
  • Stay well-hydrated to optimize the integrity of mucous membranes.
  • Let yourself and your patients get more sleep. Sleep is immensely important for multiple aspects of immune function.

The virus will evolve, and we will adapt.  At some point, it will resolve.  Right now, many people, especially those in the media, are overreacting.  That is always a mistake.  There has never been a substitute for reason, prudence, and common sense.  Steady as she goes.  How often can you say it?

 

Coronavirus – An Update

Posted Posted in Elder Care, Homestudy, Nutrition, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

It’s progressing. We knew it would.

The novel coronavirus, just renamed CoVID 19, has surpassed SARS in the number of deaths caused.

The number of confirmed cases worldwide is 60,081 with 1363 deaths. Nearly 99% of cases are still in China and the mortality rate remains around 2‒3%. There are undoubtedly far more unconfirmed cases in China since large numbers of people are at home with mild to moderate symptoms, or even asymptomatic infection. Inadequate testing to confirm the virus or rapidly triage and admit patients to intensive care in Chinese hospitals appears to be a serious problem.

The Chinese physician who first recognized an outbreak of SARS-like illness was targeted and arrested for “rumor-mongering.” He was even forced to recant his story. Dr. Li Wenliang contracted the coronavirus and died last week. Even his death was denied by authorities for a day. Dr. Li joins a brave, dedicated, compassionate group of heroic physicians throughout history who succumbed to the very illness they were treating. His memory will be honored.

The only way to solve a serious problem is to address it in an open, straightforward manner. Secrecy rarely solves serious problems. We’ve all heard the old dictum, “Sunlight is the best disinfectant.” Fortunately, the President’s task force on the coronavirus has done an excellent job of educating the public, securing and screening ports of entry, coordinating distribution of viral test kits to U.S. labs, evacuating Americans from China, and quarantining appropriate people with possible exposure.

The CDC, NIH, and Department of Health and Human Services personnel are working nonstop to contain the virus and develop a vaccine and potential treatment. In the meantime, supply chain disruption is affecting car companies, tech firms, and even medical supply businesses. Many of our OTC and prescription medications, including antibiotics, are made in China. The FDA has evacuated our personnel who inspect these production plants. There may well be consequences in the coming weeks and months here in the U.S.

Meanwhile, we’re in peak cold and flu season. Fastidious hygiene remains key:

  • Wash your hands – frequently and with soap and hot water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Do not touch your mouth, nose, and eyes. Viral particles suspended in respiratory droplets can penetrate mucous membranes and conjunctiva very easily.
  • Maintain at least 6 feet between yourself and others (social distancing)
  • Avoid crowds and unessential travel
  • Get more sleep than you think you need
  • Stay home if you have cold or flu symptoms (and don’t lay a guilt trip on colleagues who are sick)
  • Disinfect hard surfaces frequently. This coronavirus can apparently survive on hard surfaces as long as 9 days. Phones, keyboards, bathroom fixtures, door handles, and steering wheels are just a few examples.

Seasonal epidemics triggered by a mutated virus can be devastating, but eventually they are contained. Until then, our job is to stay calm, stay informed, and practice the time-tested principles of good patient care and common sense.

The Keto Craze

Posted Posted in Continuing Education, Homestudy, Nutrition, Seminars, Webinars

By Dr. Laura Pawlak

Unlike any time in history, Americans are faced with an obesity epidemic.  The sensible weight-loss guidelines of a mere decade ago appear to be failing.

“The best foods to eat on a diet?  The best foods to eat to keep weight off?  The same foods you should eat when you are not on a diet, but just less of them.”  Dr. Frank Sacks, Harvard School of Public Health, 2009.

The above statement was based on the study of 48 popular diets. All diets failed to produce significant differences in sustained weight loss.

Fast-tracking to 2019, the American diet has drifted far from the standard of what should be consumed. The foods we eat are primarily processed, containing almost 90 percent of the diet’s added sugar.  Also, these foods contain too much salt, very little fiber, and lots of saturated fats.  Eating less of these foods may result in weight loss, but the body and brain remain unhealthy.

When it comes to dieting, today’s fast-changing lifestyle demands novel, quick fixes.  The hype in the latest keto diet craze is infectious:  Fast weight loss without exercise;  novel tools to measure rising ketone levels;  easy-to-find processed keto foods; and keto pills when the diet is too tough to follow.

You eat lots of fat (at 80 percent of calories), moderate amounts of protein (at 20 percent), and very few plant foods, sugar, or starch (at 5 percent).  The excess intake of calories from fat triggers metabolic, nutritional, and hormonal changes not meant to be sustained for long periods of time.  Guidance by a registered dietitian is definitely recommended.

The Atkins program proposes a moderate approach to the keto craze:  A choice of 20 percent or 40 percent of the diet as carbohydrates for a limit of one month — and progression toward more plant foods.

If weight loss is achieved on a keto diet, a major challenge still remains:  The need to maintain your lower, healthy weight with a diet that offers protection against disease — not a keto plan.

A 25-year study evaluating healthful longevity and diet, published in 2018, identified the foods you should eat for a long, disease-free life:  Consume approximately 50 percent of your calories as carbohydrates, primarily as whole plant food; eat proteins, mainly from fish and plants; and add healthy oils from olives, avocados, nuts, and seeds.


Dr. Laura Pawlak (Ph.D., R.D. emerita) is a world-renowned biochemist and dietitian emerita.  She is the author of many scientific publications and has written such best-selling books as “The Hungry Brain,” “Life Without Diets,” and “Stop Gaining Weight.”  On the subjects of nutrition and brain science, she gives talks internationally.

Nuts About Nuts

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Nutrition, Seminars, Webinars

By Dr. Laura Pawlak

Americans love nuts. Their passion has led to an increased consumption by almost 40 percent in the last 15 years.

Contrary to the belief that nuts are fattening, nuts are nutritious foods categorized as superfoods.  Nuts offer a wide variety of nutrients especially protective for the brain and cardiovascular system.

A trio of nutrients in nuts — healthy fat, fiber, and protein — make them a satisfying snack that won’t affect your waistline, assuming the portion size is a handful each day.  In fact, researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health found that regular nut consumption was associated with a slightly lower risk of weight gain and Type 2 Diabetes than a diet devoid of nuts.

A caveat is noteworthy:  If the nut is adulterated, i.e. honey glazed or chocolate coated, the word fattening would be an appropriate description of the nut.

Although nuts vary slightly in nutrient content, all varieties are beneficial. Almonds are especially high in fiber.  The macadamia nut has the most fat, mostly as monounsaturated oil.  Brazil nuts are famous for their selenium content. Pecans and hazelnuts are loaded with a variety of antioxidants.  Pistachios contain more potassium than a banana.  Cashews excel in the nutrient, lutein, a protectant for your eyes.  Walnuts provide anti-inflammatory fats similar to fish oil.

The peanut, really a legume, is a valuable addition to the nut family, offering more protein than any nut.  Ground into a nut butter, this spread is a tasty alternative to butter or margarine.

Before purchasing a peanut butter, read the label.  Unnecessary emulsifiers may be added to prevent the separation of oil.  There’s no need to purchase peanut butter with added sugar even if you have a sweet tooth.  Spread plain or crunchy peanut butter on slices of a crisp apple.  Your sweet tooth will be as satisfied as your gut.

Has your doctor asked you to lower your intake of sodium?  A few brands of peanut butter are just ground, unsalted peanuts.  Here’s a suggestion for adapting your taste buds to salt-free peanut butter:  Mix a small amount of unsalted peanut butter with the regular salted version.  Over time, increase the amount of the salt-free spread until you reach 100 percent.

In my opinion, the best-tasting peanut butter is freshly ground.  Grocery stores often place a grinder and containers next to the bulk peanut supply.  Enjoy!


Dr. Laura Pawlak (Ph.D., R.D. emerita) is a world-renown biochemist and dietitian emerita.  She is the author of many scientific publications and has written such best-selling books as “The Hungry Brain,” “Life Without Diets,” and “Stop Gaining Weight.”  On the subjects of nutrition and brain science, she gives talks internationally.

The Holidays: A Time for Comfort Food

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Nutrition, Seminars, Webinars

By Dr. Laura Pawlak

The term comfort food can be traced back to 1966, when the Palm Beach Post used the term in a story:  “Adults, when under severe emotional stress, turn to what could be called ‘comfort foods.’  These foods are associated with the security of childhood, the relief of stress, and euphoric feelings.”

Although the identification of particular items as comfort foods may be unique to an individual, patterns are detectable.  In a study of American food choices, males preferred warm, hearty, meal-related comfort foods, such as steak, casseroles, and soup.   Females consumed snacks as comfort foods, such as chocolate chip cookies and ice cream. Young or middle-age people, under 55 years of age, overwhelmingly chose snack-related, comfort foods.

As the holidays approach, families and friends gather to share an array of comfort foods that provide nostalgic or cultural value.  These foods are often characterized by their high caloric nature, rich in (1) carbohydrate and fat or (2) fat and salt.

Consuming energy-dense food awakens a group of brain structures wired together into a reward system.  This brain circuitry elicits emotions based on the sensory experience of the food.  Comfort foods trigger pleasurable feelings — moments of joy.

The chemicals responsible for feeling good are two-fold:  endorphins, nature’s opioids; and endocannabinoids, the feel-good chemicals found in marijuana.  Sugary foods activate the release of endorphins.  Pizza, cheese casseroles, and other fatty foods spur the production of endocannabinoids.

When fat and sugar are combined, as in desserts, an explosion of both endorphins and endocannabinoids floods the brain, causing elation beyond nature’s offerings.  The temptation to overeat may be overwhelming, especially when a fond memory is linked to the food.

Enjoying holiday celebrations, without consuming excessive amounts of comfort foods, requires forethought.  A plan is helpful!  For example, set aside the day before the event as a time to eat fewer calories.  Drink water, coffee, and/or tea. Have two light meals — perhaps a fruit salad and a green salad.

On the day of the celebration, eat a healthy breakfast and add a salad if you feel hungry before attending the festivity.  At the party, take a deep breath between bites of your favorite foods.  Notice the positive memories that surface as you eat slowly.

Lastly, don’t take goodies home.  Holiday gatherings are meaningful times with friends, not just food.  Savor the season!


Dr. Laura Pawlak (Ph.D., R.D. emerita) is a world-renown biochemist and dietitian emerita.  She is the author of many scientific publications and has written such best-selling books as “The Hungry Brain,” “Life Without Diets,” and “Stop Gaining Weight.”  On the subjects of nutrition and brain science, she gives talks internationally.

homestudy

A Unifying Moment

Posted Posted in Continuing Education, Nutrition, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

Thousands of people have had one goal for the past two weeks. Included were Navy Seals, professional divers, engineers, rescue specialists, medical personnel, and logistics experts from around the world. These individuals have focused on one objective: saving 12 young boys and their soccer coach from a flooded, underground cave in Thailand. The resulting real-life drama has surpassed any possible storyline in a work of fiction.

The young team set out on June 22, 2018, for soccer practice when torrential rain and flash-flooding stranded them. They were reported missing, but dangerous storms and difficult terrain hampered searches. As the days passed, hope of their survival faded. Undeterred, two British cave divers navigated a 2.5-mile cavernous tunnel one- half mile underground. They were astonished to look up and find the boys and their coach still alive. News of their miraculous find spread across the world.

Intensive planning for the daring and dangerous rescue began with offers of help from around the world. Experts from the United States, Great Britain, Australia, China, Japan, France, Denmark, and other countries converged on the scene with elaborate equipment and supplies. Communication lines, medical supplies, clean water, high-energy food supplements, and oxygen tanks were painstakingly positioned. Deep, murky, filthy water combined with passages only 15 inches in spots complicated efforts. A group of Buddhist monks kept a prayer vigil at the rescue site, and millions of people from around the world prayed for success.

Sadly, during a practice run to position oxygen tanks, a 38-year-old former Thai Navy Seal died when his own oxygen ran out. His heroic efforts were acknowledged with full military honors at his funeral. Heartbroken but determined to succeed, the rescuers pushed onward.

On Sunday, July 8, the threat of monsoon rains, dropping oxygen levels, and rising carbon dioxide levels in the cave forced a decision to proceed. The boys would have to learn how to swim and scuba dive “blind” in a matter of hours. The boys themselves decided who among them would go first. The painstaking rescue plan brought four boys out on day one. Every available oxygen tank along the 2.5-mile trek was used. After a 12-hour interval to replenish and restage oxygen tanks, four more boys were guided to waiting medical teams. Another overnight effort to replenish and restage supplies unfolded.

Finally, on July 10, news that the remaining four boys and their coach had been rescued spread around the globe in minutes. It was a unifying moment of joy and relief for the world. The courage and composure of everyone involved was a testament to the human spirit. When people cooperate for the good of others, personal, political, and cultural differences melt away in pursuit of a noble endeavor. Bravo!

More Healthy Bread, Maybe Not!

Posted Posted in Continuing Education, Homestudy, Nutrition, Seminars, Webinars

By Dr. Laura Pawlak (PhD)

The vast variety of breads available in supermarkets and bakeries reflects the unquenchable appetite of Americans for this grain-based food.  Breads labeled as “whole grain” appear to be a smart way to add fiber to your diet.

Whole grains improve regularity, slow digestion, reduce appetite, improve cholesterol, and prevent spikes in blood sugar — a major driver of obesity, high blood pressure, and Type 2 diabetes.

A whole grain bread uses the entire grain seed:  the bran (an outer layer with fiber, antioxidants, and B-vitamins); the endosperm (the middle layer of starchy carbohydrates); and the germ (the inner core, which has vitamins, minerals, some protein, and a drop of oil).

Commercial whole grain breads differ in the relative amount of whole grain content in the product.  A simple calculation, called the “10 to 1 Rule,” can guide you in choosing healthy whole grain breads:  Using the nutrition facts on the label, identify the grams of total carbohydrate and fiber.  Divide the total grams of carbs by 10.  Is there at least that much fiber stated on the label?  If so, it is considered a healthy bread.

But wait, there’s something more to consider before purchasing a whole grain bread.  Andrew Weil, M.D., an expert in Integrative Medicine, states:  “A true whole grain food retains all three parts of the seed intact.  A recent government study linked the fiber found specifically in intact whole grains to a longer, healthy life, that is, a lower risk of death at any age from conditions such as cardiovascular, respiratory and infectious diseases and possibly some cancers.”

To make bread, the intact whole grain is ground into flour.  Some of the physical properties that promote good health are less effective when whole grain seeds are processed into flour.

There are many tasty, intact whole grains available, including: amaranth; barley; brown rice; buckwheat; bulgur; cracked wheat; farro; kamut; kasha; millet; oats; quinoa; rye; wheat berries; and wild rice.  Use intact whole grains as side dishes or stuffing, in soups, stews, and salads — and as a hot, breakfast porridge.

Despite research reporting some differences in the positive effects of intact whole grains as compared to processed (ground) whole grain flour, here’s the most important message:  Aim for at least three servings of whole grains every day, including cooked, intact whole grains, whole grain cereals, and whole grain breads.  Enjoy!

Chocolate: A Smart Food

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Nutrition, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

By Dr. Laura Pawlak

There is universal agreement that chocolate is a feel good food.  Chocolate melts in your mouth, releasing its sweet, creamy, cocoa flavor, and the brain follows with a burst of “happy” chemicals.

Beyond the sensory joy of eating chocolate, there are claims that chocolate is a healthy food for the brain.  Most of us would gladly eat more chocolate if proven to benefit the brain.

Several ingredients in cocoa have been proposed to explain the possible cognitive benefits of chocolate.  Cocoa contains caffeine, a substance that enhances cognitive functioning and alertness.  Major nutrients have also been identified in the cocoa bean.  Presently, studies focus on the chemical group called flavanols.

Flavanols are micronutrients found in many fruits and vegetables, especially the fruit called the cocoa bean, the basis of chocolate.  Flavanols have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties — important for brain health.

Small studies, often supported by chocolate manufacturers, state that the cocoa flavanols can boost mood and cognitive performance — as well as blood flow to the brain.  Researchers are now evaluating the significance of these small studies by conducting large, clinical trials using a cocoa extract with known flavanol content, not chocolate.

A dose of 600-750 milligrams of flavanols is considered healthful for the brain.  To obtain this dose, you would have to consume 4.75 ounces of dark chocolate, a total of 750 calories, or 40 ounces of milk chocolate, which has 5,850 calories.

A day with adequate flavanols from commercial chocolate is also a day heavy in sugar, saturated fat, and calories — not a formula for a sharp brain.  Perhaps future studies examining chocolate’s healthful ingredients in the cocoa extract will provide more healthful ways to capture the goodness of the cocoa bean.

Meanwhile, manufacturers divert your focus from calories to health by presenting chocolate paired with a superfood, the avocado.  Called a health food, the Avocado Chocolate Bar is made of freeze-dried avocado pulp powder, 70 percent dark chocolate — plus added sugar — and has nearly 600 calories.

The bar is a convenient, but calorie-laden, snack.  The alternative — consuming whole, fresh plant food — is always a good choice for the brain.

My suggestion:  Eat dark chocolate in moderation if you like it, not because you think it will make you smarter.  For added flavanols, focus on the abundant amounts of this nutrient in grapes and berries.  Enjoy!


Dr. Laura Pawlak (Ph.D., R.D. emerita) is a world-renowned biochemist and dietitian emerita.  She is the author of many scientific publications and has written such best-selling books as “The Hungry Brain,” “Life Without Diets,” and “Stop Gaining Weight.”  On the subjects of nutrition and brain science, she gives talks internationally.

Water: The Fountain of Youth?

Posted Posted in Continuing Education, Homestudy, Nutrition, Seminars, Webinars

By Dr. Laura Pawlak

Based on the fact that about two-thirds of the body is composed of water, it seems obvious that consuming water is important for health.  Water requirements have been studied for decades.  Recommendations are narrowed to two alternatives:  Consume a minimum of eight cups of liquid per day or drink to quench thirst.

Research now reveals that drinking water when feeling thirsty boosts the brain’s performance in mental tests.  Dr. Caroline Edmonds, the author of a lead study, found that reaction times were faster after people drank water, particularly if they were thirsty before drinking.

Drinking more water than normally consumed is associated with a reduced intake of calories and sodium.  The study, led by Prof. Ruopeng An, showed that people who increased their consumption of plain water by one to three cups daily lowered total energy intake by 68-205 calories each day and their sodium intake by 78-235 grams per day.

A popular trend these days, alkaline water is promoted as a healthier choice than plain water. Several brands of alkaline water are available or machines can be purchased that make alkaline water.

Proponents claim that alkaline water kills cancer cells, banishes belly fat, lubricates joints, protects bone density, reduces acid reflux, and improves hydration.  What scientific evidence lies behind these claims?  Despite the promotion of alkaline water by the manufacturers of the product and by the media, there is very little research either to support or disprove the claims.

The pH of water is neutral, a pH of 7.  Chemicals and gases can alter the pH of water.  For example, rainwater’s pH is slightly below 7, as carbon dioxide in the air dissolves in the water and increases acidity.

Water that is too alkaline (pH above 7) has a bitter taste.  It can cause deposits that encrust pipes and appliances.  Highly acidic water tastes sour and may corrode metals or even dissolve them.  Fortunately, as the kidneys filter blood, the pH of blood and all cells are rebalanced close to neutral, avoiding any unhealthy effect of liquids or foods that raise or lower pH.

Citrus fruits are named for their citric acid content, but don’t be fooled by that fact.  Citrons, lemons, limes, oranges, and grapefruits — all citrus fruits — produce alkaline byproducts once digested. So, you can squeeze juice from a lemon or other citrus into plain water and make your own alkaline water.  Enjoy!


Dr. Laura Pawlak (Ph.D., R.D. emerita) is a world-renowned biochemist and dietitian emerita.  She is the author of many scientific publications and has written such best-selling books as “The Hungry Brain,” “Life Without Diets,” and “Stop Gaining Weight.”  On the subjects of nutrition and brain science, she gives talks internationally.