Avoiding Holiday Weight Gain

Posted on Posted in Continuing Education, Homestudy, Psychology, Seminars

pumpkin-pie-520655_640Turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, gravy, sweet potato casserole, cranberry sauce, more mashed potatoes, pumpkin pie, pecan pie, cherry pie, triple chocolate cheesecake, cookies, fudge, fruitcake. Okay, pass on the fruitcake. Is it any wonder why the vast majority of exercise equipment is sold in the month of January? This year, with a little foresight and planning, things could be different.

Prevention has always been preferable to cure. A few weeks of “preventive dieting” is not a bad way to avoid the shock and horror of stepping on the scale in January. It need not be as stringent as clear liquids and lettuce from Thanksgiving to New Year’s. That would be cruel and unusual punishment. However, a few, simple, common sense measures really can make a significant difference:

  • Have a healthy breakfast with some protein and whole grains. People who routinely eat breakfast (not a crème-filled doughnut) consume an average of two hundred calories less per day than people who skip breakfast.
  • Try not to drink calories. Avoid sugary beverages such as sodas, sweetened tea, lemonade, juice drinks. Diet sodas may be tempting, but they can actually cause an increase in appetite.
  • Cut back on alcohol for several weeks. Save the wine or cocktails for the really special meals. Alcohol consumption generally increases significantly from Thanksgiving through New Year’s. Unfortunately, alcohol is loaded with empty calories and can slow metabolic rate. It also disrupts normal sleep architecture.
  • Preserve and protect sleep. Multiple studies now confirm that sleep deprivation in both children and adults is associated with weight gain. There is no mystery. Even one night of inadequate sleep can adversely affect numerous hormones, including cortisol, thyroid, growth hormone, leptin, and ghrelin. Metabolic rate can drop and appetite increases. The result is weight gain. Ease up on the late nights and parties.
  • Aim for 30 minutes of exercise every day. There’s no need to wait for January 2. The benefits of exercise are legion. Apart from the improvement in conditioning, strength, and flexibility, exercise is a terrific way to cope with holiday stress, improve sleep quality, and possibly escape annoying relatives for a while.
  • Have a light, high-protein snack before heading off to a party. Working all day, skipping dinner, and arriving at a party in a state of semi-starvation is a recipe for overindulgence. Some yogurt, a little cottage cheese, or a small bowl of cereal before leaving the house can boost self-control in the face of tempting treats.
  • Downsize plates, bowls, glasses, and mugs. Most people will eat whatever food is presented on a plate, whether it’s 10 inches or 6 inches. Use small luncheon plates or salad plates at home for every meal. This is a great strategy for year-round weight control.
  • Split dessert with a friend even at the “big event” meals. TUMS will not be required as the after-dinner mint.

Avoiding holiday weight gain is not the impossible dream. It’s entirely possible with a little planning and discipline. Besides, no one will really miss all that fruitcake.

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