A Real Hero to Honor

Posted on Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Gary Michael Rose is a devoted 69-year-old husband, father, and grandfather.  Many people in Huntsville, Alabama, know him from his commitment to multiple volunteer projects.  For decades he has served as a Knight of Columbus, helped at a soup kitchen, and repaired broken appliances for the sick and elderly.  That’s only a partial list.

Only a handful of people knew that Gary Michael Rose was a war hero of the highest caliber because for 40 years he never said one word about it.  Not one word.  On October 23, 2017, Captain Rose received the Congressional Medal of Honor.  Now the whole world has a real hero to emulate and honor.

“Mike,” as people call him, trained as a Special Forces medic during the Vietnam War.  His second assignment involved a top secret mission into Laos to stem the flow of weapons to enemy fighters.  It wasn’t long before all hell broke loose.

The men in Mike’s unit sustained heavy casualties.  Desperate to save them, Mike raced into small-weapons and machine-gun fire, tending to the wounded as he shielded them with his own body.  One by one, Mike used one hand to hoist a wounded soldier over his back and held a gun in his other hand to return enemy fire.

Eventually, Mike sustained multiple wounds himself, but that didn’t deter him. When a chopper finally arrived to evacuate the wounded, it was unable to land and was forced to hover above the ground.  Mike lifted and pushed his wounded buddies into the helicopter in the midst of gunfire.  As the chopper began to lift up, the gunner was struck in the neck by a bullet.  Mike fashioned a pressure dressing with several bandanas to contain the bleeding.  But the helicopter was badly damaged and crash- landed.  In an unbelievable display of courage and fortitude, Mike raced in and out of the smoldering chopper to save the wounded before everything exploded.

After four days and nights of constant combat, no food or sleep, and nonstop efforts to save others despite his own injuries, Mike and his men were evacuated.  The Army believed that Captain Gary Michael Rose saved between 60 to 70 men, including the man who was shot in the neck.

All of this happened in 1970.  Mike never discussed it with anyone because the mission was classified.  His men talked about it though — through channels at the Pentagon.  For 47 years his men campaigned to get Mike the medal he deserved.  Mike finally received his medal, and many of men witnessed the ceremony at the White House.

If someone had written a screenplay detailing the heroism of Gary Michael Rose in combat, it would have been rejected as “unrealistic.”  Fortunately for the world, Captain Rose is very realistic.  After a ceremony at the Pentagon, he’s going home to Alabama with his family.  He still has people to help.