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A Heroine of the Highest Order

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Media reports described her as merely “an older woman.”  The implications are obvious.  “Older woman” translates into commonplace, generic, ordinary, and unimportant.  Nothing could have been further from the truth.  Lori Gilbert-Kaye was the 60-year-old lady who threw herself between the vicious 19-year-old gunman and the rabbi at the synagogue shooting in Poway, California.

Members of the congregation were observing the final day of Passover when they were attacked by unbridled evil.  Lori Gilbert-Kaye gave her life to save her rabbi. There is nothing commonplace, generic, ordinary, or unimportant about that.  Rabbi Goldstein described her valiant action at a deeply moving ceremony in the Rose Garden on the National Day of Prayer.  He lost several fingers in the horrific attack, but his wisdom, insight, courage, and compassion were only highlighted in the process.  He honored Lori Gilbert-Kaye in his brief but eloquent remarks.  A march in her honor is scheduled for early June.  No doubt many people will learn more about this kind, generous, devoted, and heroic “older woman.”

Is there something those of us in health care and education can learn from all of this?  Indeed, there is.  People have names.  They are not merely generic patients, students, or account numbers.  They are not simply old ladies or cases or room numbers.  Every human being has an identity, a personal story with challenges, heartaches, triumphs, and loved ones.  A woman who instinctively gave her own life to save another deserves to be known and remembered by her name.  Lori Gilbert-Kaye was heroic in life and in death.  She set a beautiful example for our nation.

Most of us will never have to make the split-second decision to sacrifice our own life to save that of another.  We do, however, have an opportunity everyday to honor others by using their proper names.  Lori Gilbert-Kaye was far more than an “older woman.”  She was a heroine of the highest order.