Einstein Was Right!

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Psychology, Uncategorized

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

“Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.”  Albert Einstein said that many years ago.  He was referring to physics, but his wisdom could easily apply to any situation, including COVID-19 vaccines.

Increasing numbers of people in business, politics, education and, of course, the media, are trying to force COVID-19 vaccines on everyone.  “Vaccination or termination” has become the new threat to employees and students.  Most people, regardless of their lofty achievements in other areas, are not well-versed in the fine points of immunology.  Sadly, however, some of them are convinced that they know what’s best for everyone.

Nearly everything in medicine carries potential risk and reward.  Both possibilities must always be considered.  Every prescription we write and every procedure we do has some potential to cause harm.  Every patient is unique.  Every individual has a combination of genetic factors, past illnesses, medications, and allergies.  Also each patient has metabolic, endocrine, hematologic, rheumatologic, neurologic, and cardio-pulmonary conditions that may need to be considered.  For example, patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and other autoimmune disorders produce antibodies that attack their own tissues, hence the need to suppress — with potent drugs such as TNF (tumor necrosis factor) inhibitors — certain parameters of immune function.  Giving such a patient a vaccine, which stimulates the immune system to produce antibodies, can be unwise.  This is usually most problematic with live virus vaccines such as those for varicella, measles, and mumps, and rubella.  The COVID-19 vaccines are messenger RNA-based.  They do not contain live virus.

Pregnant women with COVID-19 illness are at increased risk for serious disease and mortality.  According to the Food and Drug Administration, data on the COVID-19 vaccines are “insufficient to inform vaccine-associated risk in pregnancy”.  Translation:  we don’t know enough yet to be dogmatic about these decisions.

All of COVID-19 vaccines available in the United States (Pfizer, BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson) are safe, effective, and appropriate for the vast majority of people.  But good medical practice is not about the vast majority of people.  Medical decisions are based on the conditions, needs, and details of the individual patient.  Politicians, corporate chief executives, school board members, and media types have no business making (or forcing) medical decisions on other people.

Einstein was right.  Oversimplifying anything is a bad idea.  So is judging others without knowing all the details.

Correct Answers

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Quick.  Looking back on your life, who was your favorite teacher or coach?  Was it the one who let you get away with anything?  Was it the one who set standards so low you tripped over them?  Was it the person who gave you a gold star for repetitive breathing?  The answer to all of those questions is a resounding “no.”  Most of us would agree that our favorite teacher or coach was the one who inspired us to give our best and achieve more than we thought we could.

Recently, many of us were stunned when state education officials in Virginia proposed eliminating any advanced or accelerated math classes prior to the 11th grade.  They opined that such classes were “unfair” or “intimidating” to less gifted students.  Somehow they reasoned that slowing down the smarter students would make sense.  We already went through this in the 1970s.  Educational giants back then introduced the “New Math” and declared that spelling and grammar didn’t “count.”  Creativity was king.  More recently, the “woke” crowd has informed us that correct answers don’t even matter when it comes to math.  “Process” matters.  In order for our future generation to compete at the highest level, both precision and creativity matter; we need both to succeed. 

We need advanced math to send astronauts to the moon and to the international space station.  We need math to calculate a safe antibiotic dose for critically-ill patients with deteriorating renal function.  Correct answers matter.