On Leadership, Science, and Happiness

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Elder Care, Homestudy, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

It’s safe to say we’ll all be happy to see this year come to an end.  Fifty years from now people will still be studying the pandemic of 2020, catastrophic hurricanes, tornadoes, wildfires, riots, a controversial election, and the Nashville bombing.  We have reasons to be exhausted.

Despite all these dreadful events, or perhaps because of them, there is much to be learned.  It could easily fill a book, but for now, a few thoughts will suffice:

On Leadership

  • The people who are trying to frighten you are trying to control you.  Ignore them. Good leaders inspire confidence and optimism, not despair.
  • There is never a place for panic in leadership. There is never a place for panic in public policy.
  • Good leaders actually do what they ask others to do. They do not exempt themselves from difficult, inconvenient, or unpleasant tasks.
  • True leaders respect others.  They do not harbor disdain for others.
  • Tyrants (false leaders) often succeed because cowardice is so common.  Show some spine when bullies arise, and remember, no politician or bureaucrat has missed a paycheck in 2020.
  • When in the course of human events, it becomes clear that what you’re doing isn’t working, it’s time to change what you’re doing — especially in a crisis.

On Science

  • Genuine science requires brutal honesty, discipline, openness, acceptance of uncertainty, and humility.  Real science always has been and always will be a work in progress.  When people scream, “Follow the science,” all too often they mean, “Do as I say.”
  • The main point of science is to help us overcome problems and adapt to difficult circumstances. Creative people in every domain have learned to adapt to massive challenges over the years. The Year 2020 was no exception.  In a crisis people need practical advice and suggestions, not domination and suppression.

On Happiness

  • Most of us still have much for which to be grateful, and there is no happiness without gratitude. Take nothing for granted. Many of us now miss things as simple as family, friends, hugs, and handshakes.
  • There are plenty of unkind people in the world. Don’t be one of them.  Kindness and happiness go hand in hand.
  • Don’t believe anyone who insists our darkest days lie ahead.  Such people do not understand the wonders of the human spirit.  It is never time to give up, despair, or cower in a corner.

Fear not.  We’ve learned a great deal in 2020, and we will build on that knowledge.  Be focused.  Be engaged.  Stay informed (not indoctrinated).  No matter what happens in 2021, do not relinquish your right to engage in independent thought and speech.  The future depends on it.

Happy New Year to All.

Exactly What We Need

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Nutrition, Psychology

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

The holidays have gotten off to an odd start.  Thanksgiving was different, to say the least.  Most family gatherings were small and lots of people were alone.  Now the focus has shifted to shopping and decorating. At least it’s a pleasant distraction.

Hanukkah begins on December 10th and Advent started this week.  Who knows what will happen by Christmas.  Given the depressing and stressful nature of this entire year, it might be uplifting to embrace some time-tested traditions of a spiritual nature. For centuries the Christmas tradition of Advent was a time of fasting, prayer, and alms giving.  Many of us were taught to “give up” something like candy or soda as a spiritual discipline in preparation for Christmas.  Nothing wrong with that, especially since many of us have gained a few pounds during the pandemic.  But giving up candy doesn’t help someone feel better.  And right now, nearly everyone needs a little something to feel better.  So here’s an old idea that might help us all feel uplifted.

Cut 25 strips of paper and write an activity for the day on each one.  Fold the strips of paper and place them in a jar or bowl.  Each morning, pick one, and commit to performing the activity.  By Christmas, you will be a better person (and a happier one) for the ripple effect you will have set in motion.

Here are some examples:

  • Send a Christmas card with a personal note of gratitude and encouragement to an active service member or veteran.
  • Leave a little treat (not homemade this year) on the doorstep of a neighbor you haven’t met.
  • Stop by your church or synagogue for a few minutes of quiet prayer or reflection.
  • Give up fancy coffee drinks or alcohol for a month and donate the money you save to a shelter.
  • Offer to do a grocery store run for an elderly neighbor.
  • Say something pleasant or kind to someone you don’t like, perhaps a grumpy patient.
  • Send a small floral arrangement anonymously to someone in a nursing home.
  • Order take out or delivery and give an unexpectedly generous tip.
  • Apologize to someone you may have hurt or offended. It may be more difficult than giving up candy.
  • Place a treat in the mailbox for your mail carrier just because.
  • Try to get through the entire day without criticizing anyone.  There’s some spiritual discipline!

You can make up your own list. It’s well worth the effort.  The next four weeks will pass regardless of our actions.  This year the true spirit of Advent could be exactly what we need.

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