Some Timeless Advice

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

How’s your bank balance doing these days?  More importantly, how’s your emotional balance doing?  Incessant political nastiness, market swoons, natural disasters, urban decline, violent crime, geo-political tensions, ever-expanding congestion, traffic, and professional pressures are weighing on all of us.  And we haven’t even mentioned the personal stresses of illness, family strife, teenage traumas, aging parents, and relationship struggles.  At least there doesn’t seem to be a massive asteroid threatening our existence.  That was a joke.

Most of us have learned that taking only withdrawals from a bank account does not work well.  Sooner or later we need to make some deposits.  The same principle applies to our emotional balance.  The stresses we face in everyday life represent withdrawals from our emotional reserve.  We need to balance those withdrawals with some regular deposits.  And that, unfortunately, is not always so easy or obvious.

Emotional depletion has consequences.  Eventually it can compromise our immune, neuroendocrine, and cardiovascular systems.  Since millions of us are experiencing emotional depletion, we need to be intentional about restoring our emotional account balance.  Here are a few ideas:

  • Take a deep breath and slow down long enough to realize you’re running on empty.
  • Disconnect from your devices, social media, and TV for several hours. If this causes undue stress, you know you’re emotionally depleted.
  • Spend at least 15-20 minutes each day in a natural setting. Remember nature?
  • Let go of anger, resentment, and criticism. No one can experience love, joy, or peace when he or she is consumed with negative thoughts and emotions.
  • Do something physical and useful. Clean out a closet, spruce up the yard, bake cookies, wash the car.  As long as it gets you up and moving and has tangible results (not staring at a screen), it will help.
  • Call or visit with a sympathetic person who will truly listen and encourage you. Texting doesn’t count.
  • Do something thoughtful and unexpected for another person.
  • Forgive everyone.

If all else fails, remember some timeless advice from Abraham Lincoln, “This too shall pass.”  It always does.

Passport to Health? Maybe not…

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Elder Care, Homestudy, Pain, Psychology

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

“It relieves headaches, insomnia, anxiety, depression, arthritis, fibromyalgia, and pain of all kinds.” Sounds great. Unfortunately, this is merely an excerpt from an ad for CBD oil. CBD stands for cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive molecule that has some documented anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anxiolytic properties. CBD products and stores are popping up all over the country. Even the business networks are covering possible investment opportunities. CBD products now include teas, tinctures, topical creams, pills, oral solutions, sprays, candies, cookies, gummies, chocolates, and Italian ice. No kidding.

The vast majority of studies on CBD are preclinical, animal studies (mostly rats). Trying to extrapolate research findings from rats to humans is not medically sound. It can also be downright dangerous. But many people have a stunning ability to believe what they want to believe.

We live in an age of narrative. The narrative about far too many topics is carefully crafted by self-proclaimed elites in the media, the entertainment industry, the political realm, and the academic world. Money is a critical factor in forming a narrative, but equally vital is the perception of being “cool.” Being perceived as “cool” is of the utmost importance to a staggering number of people. The really “cool” people don’t even realize they’re cool because they’re too busy pursuing truth and genuine accomplishment.

When it comes to a fad like CBD, the prudent people are open-minded but cautious. Centuries of experience in numerous cultures should have taught us something about con-artists and snake oil. Some of our grandmothers were certain that a dose of castor oil every week would cure anything. Millions of people in Asia still believe the rhinoceros horn can heal everything from impotence to cancer. And despite all our science, people still spend ridiculous sums of money on ground apricot pits and crystals in place of chemotherapy.

The actual pharmacologic effects of CBD products are still being evaluated. Standardization, purity of product, dosing, absorption, bioavailability, half-life, potential contraindications, adverse effects, and drug-drug interactions need to be elucidated -– in people, not rats.

Until then, be careful. Snake oil salesmen abound, and they’ll probably seem really “cool.” Buyer beware. CBD Italian ice is likely not your passport to health.

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