The Wonders All Around Us

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

I was startled recenty at 5 A.M.  A strange, golden light was shining on my bedroom wall.  It was not a familiar pattern.  Grabbing my robe, I went to the window and pulled back the curtains.  A massive, misty, yellow sphere was glowing just above the tree line on the horizon.  I went outside.

Was it a search light?  Was some group starting construction at 5 A.M.?  The air was heavy and still with a level of humidity that was oppressive.  The birds were beginning to chirp, but there were no typical sounds of annoying human activity.

The sphere of light was larger than any natural phenomenon that I had ever seen.  It was bright yellow and appeared to be expanding as I watched in perplexed amazement.  Trying not to trip in the dark of my backyard, I stood at the edge of the tree line. Clouds on the horizon started to part.  I gasped out loud as I realized a full moon was setting in the most spectacular fashion I had ever witnessed.

I wanted to call my neighbors to come see this miraculous spectacle.  But then, not everyone appreciates exquisite beauty at 5 A.M.

It occurred to me that 50 years earlier, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins were blasting off on Apollo 11 for man’s first trip to that magnificent yellow sphere.

Now I understand.  “Tranquility Base:  The Eagle has landed.”  On July 20, 1969, anyone on earth who had access to a TV was glued to it.  The entire world paused for a time, united in hopeful, anxious awe at what we were watching on grainy black and white images.  Most people under the age of 57 or so don’t understand.  We were spellbound in our pride and joy at being Americans and citizens of the good earth.  No one watching that glorious event had a dry eye.  It was literally hard to breathe.

July 20, 1969, was one of the most important days in human history.  It happened because President Kennedy set the goal, and 400,000 people worked around the clock for nearly a decade to achieve it.

Most of us will never be part of something as tremendous as the space program.  But we can choose to notice the wonders all around us.  Sometimes, I wonder how many extraordinary sights we all miss because we’re sleeping or busy or distracted.  Getting up at 5 A.M. has its rewards.

You Never Know Who Might Be Listening

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Are you well-spoken?  Would other people agree?  There are many aspects of professional behavior, and speaking is one of the most important. Unfortunately, as a culture, our speech patterns, vocabulary, and grammar are deteriorating badly.

Incessant use of e-mail and texting has had a negative impact on speaking skills and vocal quality.  Parents, teachers, and bosses seem reluctant to correct anyone.  Someone might get upset.  People often confuse correction with criticism.  That’s misguided and it can undermine success.  Part of being an effective health-care professional involves conveying knowledge and inspiring confidence among patients and colleagues.  Bearing that in mind, here’s a little checklist to help polish your speaking skills:

  • Watch out for verbal crutches (um, uh, well, like, you know). Better yet, eliminate them.
  • Don’t start or end a sentence with the word “so.” So, we’ve had a lot of turnover lately, so.
  • Learn the correct use of the words “fewer” and “less.” Skim milk has fewer calories than whole milk.
  • Try not to begin or end a sentence with a preposition (to, of, with, for, on).
    • Incorrect: He doesn’t have any place to go to.
    • Correct: He doesn’t have any place to go.
    • Incorrect: We have many medications to choose from.
    • Correct: We have many medications from which to choose.
  • Learn when to use the subjunctive case.
    • Incorrect: I wish it was true.
    • Correct: I wish it were true.
  • Review the proper use of pronouns: Attention, Southerners.
    • Incorrect: Her and her husband went to the seminar.
    • Correct: She and her husband went to the seminar.
  • Recall the use of past perfect tense: Attention, Midwesterners.
    • Incorrect: Ordinarily I would have went home.
    • Correct: Ordinarily I would have gone home.
  • Eliminate redundant adjectives: Attention entire country.
    • Incorrect: The patient had a small, little bruise.
    • Correct: The patient had a small bruise.
  • Pay attention to singular or plural agreement between nouns and verbs.
    • Incorrect: There’s lots of options.
    • Correct: There is a lot of options.
  • Avoid constant self-reference.
    • “For me, this is not helpful.”  It’s not about you, but this phrase is ubiquitous.
  • Check your vocal quality. Is your voice loud, shrill, strident, or frenetic?
  • Watch out for bad habits in the cadence of your speech. Refrain from “sing-song” phrasing and “up-talking” at the end of a sentence.  It makes anyone sound like a silly school girl.
  • Slow down. Smart people often speak quickly, but you don’t want to sound like a toy machine gun or a cartoon character on amphetamines.
  • Diction is a crucial part of effective speaking.  It requires effort.
  • Guard against “whiny girl” or “lazy girl” voice. Irritating sound emanates from the posterior pharynx with inadequate volume.  The speaker comes across as bored and boring.  Modulate your voice to sound like a competent, knowledgeable adult.
  • Be careful with gestures. Many people overuse hand gestures.  It’s distracting and undermines the real message.  Excessive gestures can make someone look desperate.  Politicians take note.

We work hard to develop our careers.  Don’t allow poor speaking habits to sabotage your future.  You never know who might be listening.

Spotlight on Eggs

Posted Posted in Continuing Education, Elder Care, Homestudy, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

By Dr. Laura Pawlak

The hard-boiled egg, a breakfast omelet, and fancy deviled eggs — these are favorites among Americans. Eggs are also a good source of protein, along with meat, fish, and poultry.  But, is the egg considered a healthy choice?

In 1980, the U.S. Department of Agriculture began releasing dietary recommendations for Americans with a focus on cardiovascular health.  Dietary cholesterol was stated as a major contributor to heart disease.  Eggs, the number one source of cholesterol in the diet, took the spotlight.

While dietary cholesterol can be found in all foods derived from animals, one egg has about 200 mg. of cholesterol while a serving of beef, pork, or chicken has less than 100 mg. per serving.  The dietary limit for cholesterol (300 mg. per day) significantly limiting the choice of egg-based meals and snacks.

Decades of research have led to a very different interpretation of the role cholesterol plays in heart health.  There was no direct evidence to support the link between egg consumption and blood levels of cholesterol — the risk factor for heart disease. The liver produces most of the cholesterol measured in the blood.

By 2015, dietary cholesterol was no longer considered “the nutrient of concern” for healthy people. New dietary guidelines reflected an emphasis on whole foods, rather than individual nutrients.  For example, fish provides essential omega-3 fatty acids and protein, not just cholesterol.  Red meat contains multiple substances beyond cholesterol that negatively affect heart health.

Eggs made a comeback, but included a warning to eat eggs in moderation — only one or 2 eggs per day. Further restriction was recommended for persons with Type 2 diabetes:  Limit eggs to four per week.

This year, new research by Victor Zhong and colleagues (Journal of the American Medical Association, 2019) rekindles the debate about the role of dietary cholesterol from eggs and red meat in cardiovascular disease and all cause mortality, but official guidelines remain unchanged.

According to Dr. Frank Hu, of the Harvard School of Public Health (2019), “For persons who are generally healthy, eat fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and legumes and lower [the] consumption of red and processed meats and sugar.  A low to moderate intake of eggs can be included as part of a healthy eating pattern, but they are not essential.  There is a range of other foods one can choose for a variety of healthful breakfasts, such as whole grain toast with nut butter, fresh fruits, and plain yogurt.”

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Dr. Laura Pawlak (Ph.D., R.D. emerita) is a world-renown biochemist and dietitian emerita.  She is the author of many scientific publications and has written such best-selling books as “The Hungry Brain,” “Life Without Diets,” and “Stop Gaining Weight.”  On the subjects of nutrition and brain science, she gives talks internationally.