The Keto Craze

Posted Posted in Continuing Education, Homestudy, Nutrition, Seminars, Webinars

By Dr. Laura Pawlak

Unlike any time in history, Americans are faced with an obesity epidemic.  The sensible weight-loss guidelines of a mere decade ago appear to be failing.

“The best foods to eat on a diet?  The best foods to eat to keep weight off?  The same foods you should eat when you are not on a diet, but just less of them.”  Dr. Frank Sacks, Harvard School of Public Health, 2009.

The above statement was based on the study of 48 popular diets. All diets failed to produce significant differences in sustained weight loss.

Fast-tracking to 2019, the American diet has drifted far from the standard of what should be consumed. The foods we eat are primarily processed, containing almost 90 percent of the diet’s added sugar.  Also, these foods contain too much salt, very little fiber, and lots of saturated fats.  Eating less of these foods may result in weight loss, but the body and brain remain unhealthy.

When it comes to dieting, today’s fast-changing lifestyle demands novel, quick fixes.  The hype in the latest keto diet craze is infectious:  Fast weight loss without exercise;  novel tools to measure rising ketone levels;  easy-to-find processed keto foods; and keto pills when the diet is too tough to follow.

You eat lots of fat (at 80 percent of calories), moderate amounts of protein (at 20 percent), and very few plant foods, sugar, or starch (at 5 percent).  The excess intake of calories from fat triggers metabolic, nutritional, and hormonal changes not meant to be sustained for long periods of time.  Guidance by a registered dietitian is definitely recommended.

The Atkins program proposes a moderate approach to the keto craze:  A choice of 20 percent or 40 percent of the diet as carbohydrates for a limit of one month — and progression toward more plant foods.

If weight loss is achieved on a keto diet, a major challenge still remains:  The need to maintain your lower, healthy weight with a diet that offers protection against disease — not a keto plan.

A 25-year study evaluating healthful longevity and diet, published in 2018, identified the foods you should eat for a long, disease-free life:  Consume approximately 50 percent of your calories as carbohydrates, primarily as whole plant food; eat proteins, mainly from fish and plants; and add healthy oils from olives, avocados, nuts, and seeds.


Dr. Laura Pawlak (Ph.D., R.D. emerita) is a world-renowned biochemist and dietitian emerita.  She is the author of many scientific publications and has written such best-selling books as “The Hungry Brain,” “Life Without Diets,” and “Stop Gaining Weight.”  On the subjects of nutrition and brain science, she gives talks internationally.

Nuts About Nuts

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Nutrition, Seminars, Webinars

By Dr. Laura Pawlak

Americans love nuts. Their passion has led to an increased consumption by almost 40 percent in the last 15 years.

Contrary to the belief that nuts are fattening, nuts are nutritious foods categorized as superfoods.  Nuts offer a wide variety of nutrients especially protective for the brain and cardiovascular system.

A trio of nutrients in nuts — healthy fat, fiber, and protein — make them a satisfying snack that won’t affect your waistline, assuming the portion size is a handful each day.  In fact, researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health found that regular nut consumption was associated with a slightly lower risk of weight gain and Type 2 Diabetes than a diet devoid of nuts.

A caveat is noteworthy:  If the nut is adulterated, i.e. honey glazed or chocolate coated, the word fattening would be an appropriate description of the nut.

Although nuts vary slightly in nutrient content, all varieties are beneficial. Almonds are especially high in fiber.  The macadamia nut has the most fat, mostly as monounsaturated oil.  Brazil nuts are famous for their selenium content. Pecans and hazelnuts are loaded with a variety of antioxidants.  Pistachios contain more potassium than a banana.  Cashews excel in the nutrient, lutein, a protectant for your eyes.  Walnuts provide anti-inflammatory fats similar to fish oil.

The peanut, really a legume, is a valuable addition to the nut family, offering more protein than any nut.  Ground into a nut butter, this spread is a tasty alternative to butter or margarine.

Before purchasing a peanut butter, read the label.  Unnecessary emulsifiers may be added to prevent the separation of oil.  There’s no need to purchase peanut butter with added sugar even if you have a sweet tooth.  Spread plain or crunchy peanut butter on slices of a crisp apple.  Your sweet tooth will be as satisfied as your gut.

Has your doctor asked you to lower your intake of sodium?  A few brands of peanut butter are just ground, unsalted peanuts.  Here’s a suggestion for adapting your taste buds to salt-free peanut butter:  Mix a small amount of unsalted peanut butter with the regular salted version.  Over time, increase the amount of the salt-free spread until you reach 100 percent.

In my opinion, the best-tasting peanut butter is freshly ground.  Grocery stores often place a grinder and containers next to the bulk peanut supply.  Enjoy!


Dr. Laura Pawlak (Ph.D., R.D. emerita) is a world-renown biochemist and dietitian emerita.  She is the author of many scientific publications and has written such best-selling books as “The Hungry Brain,” “Life Without Diets,” and “Stop Gaining Weight.”  On the subjects of nutrition and brain science, she gives talks internationally.

Pop Quiz!

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Quick!  What illness can cause fatal pneumonia, bacterial superinfection, meningitis, myelitis, encephalitis, acute thrombocytopenic purpura, transient hepatitis, or subacute sclerosing panencephalitis?  The answer is measles.  Each year nearly 20 million people are infected worldwide.  There are 200,000 deaths, most of which occur in children.  The anti-vaxxers are utterly unaware of these facts, but there has never been a shortage of ignorance in the world.

Measles is a highly contagious viral illness that typically strikes children. Unfortunately, more than 90 percent of susceptible people who are exposed will contract it.  Measles spreads mostly by aerosolized droplets from the nose, throat, and mouth during coughing.  The virus can survive airborne for two hours in closed areas like a classroom.  The vast majority of measles cases in the U.S. are transmitted by travelers and immigrants, with subsequent transmission to unvaccinated children and teens.

Measles has a 7 to 14-day incubation period.  The prodrome begins with fever, sneezing, watery eyes, conjunctivitis, and a hacking cough.  Koplik spots develop on the oral mucosa, opposite the first and second upper molars — before the rash develops.  Dental professionals take note.

A sore throat typically develops shortly before the rash, which is maculo-papular.  Macules erupt just in front of and below the ears, then migrate down the sides of the neck.  Papules begin to emerge as the rash spreads down to the trunk and extremities, including the palms and soles.

Peak severity is often marked by a fever above 40⁰C.  Many children have periorbital edema, photophobia, irritability, pruritis, and a hacking cough. These kids look and feel very sick for 3 to 5 days, at which point the fever subsides and the rash fades and desquamates.  Immunocompromised patients may be profoundly ill with severe, progressive pneumonia but no rash.

Mortality in measles is about 2 in 1000 cases in the U.S. and much higher in developing nations.  In the year 2000, measles was officially declared eradicated in the U.S. by virtue of the tremendously effective MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine.  Unfortunately, multiple outbreaks have recently occurred in California, Washington, Oregon, Utah, and New York.  Many outbreaks have been linked to unvaccinated children in Amish and Orthodox Jewish communities.  Currently, an outbreak of measles in Brooklyn, New York, has been declared.  There were 285 cases, a public health emergency.  Nationally, the figure stands at 465 cases documented in 15 states.

Scientific ignorance and paranoia on the part of some parents and stunning misinformation on the internet has led to clusters of unvaccinated children and rapid spread.  The original “study” claiming that vaccines cause autism was entirely fraudulent.  It involved 12 patients and was thoroughly debunked.  The author lost his medical license.  Legitimate studies of over two million children have demonstrated absolutely no relationship between vaccines and autism.  Autism has been linked to over 100 genetic mutations.  Many people today do not like to hear the word “genetic.”

A landmark study published several years ago in the New England Journal of Medicine revealed disrupted stratification of multiple cellular layers in the cerebral cortex early on in fetal development.  The stage for autism seems to be established before birth.

Making decisions based on misguided notions and emotions can be catastrophic.  Those of us in health care and education need to set the record straight.

Look At Me!

Posted Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Psychology

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Let’s look at congestive heart failure (CHF), chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).  We all have our abbreviations and acronyms.  Every discipline does.

Now, courtesy of incredibly foolish behavior sweeping the planet we have SRT – Selfie-Related Trauma.  People around the world are being injured or even dying by doing dangerous things while trying to take “selfies” (photographs, using a cell phone, of themselves and perhaps others who may be nearby).

Most, but not all of these cases involve students.  The top three countries for SRTs are India, the United States, and Russia.  Multiple traumatic injuries most often result from falls into rivers and canyons, from falls off of cliffs or trains, and from motor vehicle accidents.  Drownings and electrocutions complete the list.

The science of photography has changed the world.  For over 150 years, people took pictures of other people, exquisite scenery, major events, and touching moments.  Now, many people can’t get through the day without taking photos of themselves engaged in the most mundane or ridiculous situations.  Look at me in the kitchen.  Look at me at work.  Look at me on vacation.  Look at me by the Statue of Liberty or the Grand Canyon.

We now have two generations, possibly three, who have been conditioned to believe a picture is incomplete without ME.  This is not only pathetic, it is dangerous.

Not long ago, a young woman at a zoo learned an important lesson about the dangers of ignoring barriers to get a selfie.  She went into an area she should not have entered and breached a barrier.  Determined to get not merely a close-up of a jaguar, but a selfie with a wild animal, she turned her back on the animal to photograph herself in front of the jaguar.  The jaguar nearly captured her.  That’s what wild animals do.  Fortunately, the woman survived to recount her foolish behavior.

Barriers and warnings exist for a reason.  They’re there to protect people.  Jaguars are spectacular animals.  They can approach speeds of 80 miles per hour and, like all cats, they are fiercely territorial.  The desire to take a photo is understandable.  The photo should be of the jaguar, not yourself with the jaguar.

There are several lessons to be learned here:

  • Never ignore barriers, roadblocks, or warning signs unless you are the EMT (emergency medical technician) responding to the situation.
  • Appreciate the beauty or wonder around us but realize that we do not enhance the beauty or wonder.
  • Never, ever turn your back on a mountainside, cliff, bridge, canyon, or a wild animal.

If people are really that enchanted with themselves, there are these things called mirrors.