Calm Down, Slow Down, and Live

Posted on Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Pain, Seminars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

I witnessed a four-car accident this week.  Moments before it happened, I knew what was coming.  A driver wanting to turn left raced through a light turning red.

Another driver coming in the opposite direction jumped a light before it turned green. They collided.  Two cars following much too closely plowed into the mess.  Everyone was all right, but a major intersection was blocked and lots of people were ready to explode.

This scenario plays out all over the country every day. Impatient, rude, distracted drivers are increasingly problematic.  Drunk or sleep-deprived drivers cause a tremendous number of accidents, but 66 percent of traffic fatalities are caused by aggressive driving.

Nearly everyone is in a hurry today, even in a place like Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.  I suppose at 9 A.M. many people are still trying to get to work, but a traffic accident will really make you late.

Research has shown that aggressive, angry drivers have distorted depth perception. This is worrisome, since traffic congestion is not about to ease and most people drive much too close to the car ahead.  Add a little rain, fog, snow, or ice, and an accident is inevitable.

Halloween is on October 31, with Thanksgiving and Christmas travel soon to follow.  Since an ounce of prevention really is worth a pound of cure, there are a few tips we can all use to stay safe:

  • Get in touch with reality. Many people underestimate how long it takes to go anywhere.  Stress levels ease when you routinely leave an extra 15-20 minutes to reach your destination — more if you drive in a large city.
  • Leave more space between your car and the one ahead. The laws of physics work whether we like them or not.  Sooner or later someone will have to stop unexpectedly.
  • Don’t try to run a stoplight. At some point, it will not go well for you.
  • Don’t be rude on the road. Cutting off another driver, yelling, making vulgar gestures, or otherwise being aggressive will not help.
  • Stay focused on driving. Unless you’re driving across Wyoming or west Texas, you must have your wits about you at every moment.  Even talking on the phone or sipping coffee can be dangerous.  Texting is flat out foolish.  Don’t do it.
  • Be considerate of other drivers. We’ve all struggled to get in the correct lane on a congested highway.  Unless it’s simply unsafe, let another driver merge ahead of you and never fuss at someone for being gracious to others.

Every person today is dealing with stress, and most of us have made an occasional error on the road.  Perhaps we could all calm down, slow down, and live to enjoy the holidays.

A Circle of Prayer

Posted on Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Elder Care, Homestudy, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars
Credit: National Review

They knelt in prayer and grief.  A dozen brave, dedicated, selfless firefighters and rescue personnel in Wilmington, NC were heartbroken on sight.  A mother and her 8-month old baby girl were killed when a tree crashed through their house during Hurricane Florence.  The father was severely injured and rushed to the hospital.  Upon completion of their agonizing task, the first responders were captured in a photo kneeling in a circle of prayer.  Within hours, the image went viral and millions felt their anguish.

Suffering and heartache are rampant here in the Carolinas now.  It will take many months and even years for people to recover from the devastation.  This part of the country has been my home for many years and my heartfelt thoughts and prayers go out to everyone in need.  I know that everyone at INR joins me in that circle of prayer.  To all our customers and colleagues who have worked with us for so long, we wish you Godspeed in your recovery.