A Unifying Moment

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Thousands of people have had one goal for the past two weeks. Included were Navy Seals, professional divers, engineers, rescue specialists, medical personnel, and logistics experts from around the world. These individuals have focused on one objective: saving 12 young boys and their soccer coach from a flooded, underground cave in Thailand. The resulting real-life drama has surpassed any possible storyline in a work of fiction.

The young team set out on June 22, 2018, for soccer practice when torrential rain and flash-flooding stranded them. They were reported missing, but dangerous storms and difficult terrain hampered searches. As the days passed, hope of their survival faded. Undeterred, two British cave divers navigated a 2.5-mile cavernous tunnel one- half mile underground. They were astonished to look up and find the boys and their coach still alive. News of their miraculous find spread across the world.

Intensive planning for the daring and dangerous rescue began with offers of help from around the world. Experts from the United States, Great Britain, Australia, China, Japan, France, Denmark, and other countries converged on the scene with elaborate equipment and supplies. Communication lines, medical supplies, clean water, high-energy food supplements, and oxygen tanks were painstakingly positioned. Deep, murky, filthy water combined with passages only 15 inches in spots complicated efforts. A group of Buddhist monks kept a prayer vigil at the rescue site, and millions of people from around the world prayed for success.

Sadly, during a practice run to position oxygen tanks, a 38-year-old former Thai Navy Seal died when his own oxygen ran out. His heroic efforts were acknowledged with full military honors at his funeral. Heartbroken but determined to succeed, the rescuers pushed onward.

On Sunday, July 8, the threat of monsoon rains, dropping oxygen levels, and rising carbon dioxide levels in the cave forced a decision to proceed. The boys would have to learn how to swim and scuba dive “blind” in a matter of hours. The boys themselves decided who among them would go first. The painstaking rescue plan brought four boys out on day one. Every available oxygen tank along the 2.5-mile trek was used. After a 12-hour interval to replenish and restage oxygen tanks, four more boys were guided to waiting medical teams. Another overnight effort to replenish and restage supplies unfolded.

Finally, on July 10, news that the remaining four boys and their coach had been rescued spread around the globe in minutes. It was a unifying moment of joy and relief for the world. The courage and composure of everyone involved was a testament to the human spirit. When people cooperate for the good of others, personal, political, and cultural differences melt away in pursuit of a noble endeavor. Bravo!