The Message

Posted on Posted in Continuing Education, Seminars, Webinars

Nearly three billion people throughout the world will observe the most solemn day of the Christian calendar this Friday (March 30, 2018). Good Friday services across the globe will commemorate the Passion and Crucifixion of Christ nearly 2,000 years ago. Even the wizards of Wall Street will suspend trading at noon out of respect for the solemnity of the day. In a world obsessed with narcissism and greed, it’s comforting to know there’s still a vestige of decorum left. I suppose many people today would consider it archaic, but the practice of foregoing activities associated with fun, entertainment, or self-indulgence on Good Friday still seem appropriate to me. Maybe I’m just old-fashioned, but I think the human spirit needs a little expression of reverence and restraint now and then.

I really believe there’s a timeless message for all of us in the events commemorated on Good Friday. It’s a message that’s meaningful regardless of one’s personal theology or lack thereof. It’s a message that’s been embraced by people as diverse as Buddha, Francis of Assisi, Mahatma Gandhi, Anwar Sadat, John Paul II, and countless survivors of unspeakable atrocities. The message is contained in nine extraordinary words spoken by Jesus through his agony on the cross. After being mocked, beaten, scourged, humiliated, and tortured, He uttered nine words that seem incomprehensible to this day. “Father, forgive them; they know not what they do.”

No words could have shocked his tormentors more. Both Seneca and Cicero have described in chilling detail the usual reactions of crucifixion victims. Neither the Scribes and Pharisees, nor the Roman centurions, could have been prepared to hear words of forgiveness from their Victim. Quite the contrary, they would have expected a vastly different response. Even the Man who preached, “Love your enemies” could not be expected to speak forgiveness in response to such hideous torment.

Any thinking person, regardless of creed or culture, can’t help but ponder the ramifications of that kind of forgiveness. How would human history change if everyone practiced that virtue? There would be no fights, no feuds, no lawsuits, no wars. Hostility and revenge would cease to exist. There would be no prejudice or persecution. It’s difficult to fathom a world where forgiveness is foremost in everyone’s mind. But it would surely be close to paradise.

The message of Good Friday goes far beyond doctrine or dogma. It speaks to the exquisite potential within the human spirit to rise above the mean, vicious, and cowardly face of evil. No message could be as noble or as necessary for the world we live in today.

 

Nourish Your Friendly Bacteria

Posted on Posted in Continuing Education, Homestudy, Nutrition, Seminars, Webinars

By Dr. Laura Pawlak

In a society of anti-bacterial warfare, who would imagine scientists touting the benefits of consuming foods fermented by living microorganisms?

The organisms are called probiotics, which means “for life.”  Identified on the skin and within the body, these beneficial microbes are part of a community of healthful and harmful micro-organisms called the microbiota.  Most probiotics are located in your gut, particularly the large intestine (colon).  Probiotics aid the digestion and absorption of food, improve immune function, overpower harmful gut microbes, and rebalance the microbiota following antibiotic therapy.

Research continues to demonstrate the versatility of these friendly critters. Potential benefits of probiotics have been seen in the treatment of gut discomfort and diseases of the gastrointestinal system.  Other benefits are treatments of vaginal and urinary tract infections.

Probiotics also release vaporous chemicals into the blood system.  Scientists are investigating the healthful effects of these metabolic products throughout the body and  brain — from fetal life through the elder years.

You can improve the number and diversity of probiotics in your gut.  Eating probiotic-rich foods is the first way to shape the makeup of your intestinal microbiota.  Fermented dairy products, such as yogurt, kefir (a fermented milk drink), and some cheeses are major sources of probotics.

Consuming a variety of fermented foods enhances microbial diversity and potency. Include sauerkraut, cider, miso, tempeh (a soy product that originated in Indonesia), buttermilk — or yogurt and kefir made from nondairy sources.  Grapes and grains, which are popular probiotics, can be fermented into wine and beer!

Another way to impact your gut microbiota positively is to eat foods that “feed” the probiotics in your gut.  Called prebiotics, foods with a high-fiber content have a positive impact on the growth of probiotics, but not on the harmful bacteria.  All plant foods contain fiber, but the fiber in whole grains improves the diversity of the probiotics — especially whole wheat and whole barley.

There is some evidence that good quality oils and certain nutrients in plants may also help probiotics to thrive.  The typical Western diet — low in fiber and high in sugar, saturated fats, and processed foods — feeds harmful microbes.  Probiotics are not associated with such negative consequences.

Although the fermentation of food and beverages is an ancient custom, the scientific analysis of the many probiotic species and strains is just now unfolding.  In the future, healthful longevity will certainly include adding more friends (probiotics) to your gut and feeding them well (prebiotics.)


Dr. Laura Pawlak (Ph.D., R.D. emerita) is a world-renown biochemist and dietitian emerita.  She is the author of many scientific publications and has written such best-selling books as “The Hungry Brain,” “Life Without Diets,” and “Stop Gaining Weight.”  On the subjects of nutrition and brain science, she gives talks internationally.