A Real Hero to Honor

Posted on Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Gary Michael Rose is a devoted 69-year-old husband, father, and grandfather.  Many people in Huntsville, Alabama, know him from his commitment to multiple volunteer projects.  For decades he has served as a Knight of Columbus, helped at a soup kitchen, and repaired broken appliances for the sick and elderly.  That’s only a partial list.

Only a handful of people knew that Gary Michael Rose was a war hero of the highest caliber because for 40 years he never said one word about it.  Not one word.  On October 23, 2017, Captain Rose received the Congressional Medal of Honor.  Now the whole world has a real hero to emulate and honor.

“Mike,” as people call him, trained as a Special Forces medic during the Vietnam War.  His second assignment involved a top secret mission into Laos to stem the flow of weapons to enemy fighters.  It wasn’t long before all hell broke loose.

The men in Mike’s unit sustained heavy casualties.  Desperate to save them, Mike raced into small-weapons and machine-gun fire, tending to the wounded as he shielded them with his own body.  One by one, Mike used one hand to hoist a wounded soldier over his back and held a gun in his other hand to return enemy fire.

Eventually, Mike sustained multiple wounds himself, but that didn’t deter him. When a chopper finally arrived to evacuate the wounded, it was unable to land and was forced to hover above the ground.  Mike lifted and pushed his wounded buddies into the helicopter in the midst of gunfire.  As the chopper began to lift up, the gunner was struck in the neck by a bullet.  Mike fashioned a pressure dressing with several bandanas to contain the bleeding.  But the helicopter was badly damaged and crash- landed.  In an unbelievable display of courage and fortitude, Mike raced in and out of the smoldering chopper to save the wounded before everything exploded.

After four days and nights of constant combat, no food or sleep, and nonstop efforts to save others despite his own injuries, Mike and his men were evacuated.  The Army believed that Captain Gary Michael Rose saved between 60 to 70 men, including the man who was shot in the neck.

All of this happened in 1970.  Mike never discussed it with anyone because the mission was classified.  His men talked about it though — through channels at the Pentagon.  For 47 years his men campaigned to get Mike the medal he deserved.  Mike finally received his medal, and many of men witnessed the ceremony at the White House.

If someone had written a screenplay detailing the heroism of Gary Michael Rose in combat, it would have been rejected as “unrealistic.”  Fortunately for the world, Captain Rose is very realistic.  After a ceremony at the Pentagon, he’s going home to Alabama with his family.  He still has people to help.

 

Why Mindfulness Matters?

Posted on Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Psychology, Seminars

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Will you exit the same way you entered?

Making that assumption is human nature.  Tragically, as people in London, Manchester, Brussels, and Berlin have witnessed, ordinary assumptions can be deadly.

Survival requires alertness.  It always has.  It always will.  There has never been a shortage of danger in the world.  The nature and complexity of threats have evolved over the millennia, but certain principles of survival endure.  Being mindful of your surroundings is one important principle.

Mindfulness is not new.  Nor is it merely a pleasant pastime. “Being in the moment” is a good way to slow down, enjoy a meal, or notice a full moon.  It may, with practice, help reduce blood pressure and stress.  That’s nice.  However, in an age when deranged fanatics and terrorists can wreak massive devastation in minutes, mindfulness can save lives.

An off-duty police officer is still a police officer.  The same is true for health-care professionals.  The next time you’re out in public, be it in a classroom, a café, or a concert hall, practice some mindfulness that really matters:

  • Be alert, be vigilant — pay attention to people and things around you — not your devices.  Do not “zone out.”
  • Scan the area for possible exits.  It is human nature to leave a place the same way you entered.  This can be a fatal mistake in a fire, a terrorist attack, or any catastrophe.
  • Resist the temptation to follow the crowd.  Panic-stricken people can be exceedingly dangerous.  Be mindful of alternate options for escape.  Being trampled to death is not a good option.
  • Cultivate enough silence in your daily life to foster good instincts and intuition.  When seconds matter, this can save lives.

The principles of mindfulness have been practiced and promoted by some very wise people over the centuries.  It is curious that a step on the path to enlightenment may be the most crucial survival skill of all.

A Thousand Acts of Compassion

Posted on Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Psychology, Seminars
credit: 10tv

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Millions of people around the world were stunned by the horror of the Las Vegas massacre.  The magnitude of the attack was staggering.  However, it was the cold, cruel, calculating mindset of the shooter that left us speechless.  Normal, decent human beings are not capable of grasping that degree of unmitigated evil.  And yet, as the days passed, stories of stunning courage, heroism, and compassion emerged.

Police officers stood up amidst crouching civilians trying to discern the shooter’s location, making themselves targets. At least two men were shot while performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).  Scores of people used their own bodies as shields to protect loved ones and even strangers.  And quick-thinking, brave people fashioned splits, tourniquets, and stretchers from anything these people could find.

Several victims survived, in part, because combat veterans inserted their fingers into bullet wounds to slow blood loss.

Many individuals demonstrated compassion, courage, and creative thinking, transporting victims to hospitals.  An Iraq war veteran “borrowed” a truck with the key in the ignition and shuttled 30 people to the emergency room (ER).  A cab driver passing by scooped up a young woman with severe wounds.  In the back seat, his passengers cradled her as they raced to the nearest hospital.  In a moving demonstration of selflessness, many of those injured or wounded declined ambulance transport or emergency care in deference to those in even more serious condition.  As one of the ER triage physicians said, “I’ve never had such wonderful patients!”

All of these stories are remarkably reminiscent of the kindness and heroism displayed by people in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing.  Countless people donated blood, water, food, accommodations, time, and money to assist victims, family members, first responders, and medical personnel.

Truly evil people always want to aggrandize themselves, often through unspeakable violence.  But violence has always been the last refuge of the coward.  And, as we’ve witnessed in Las Vegas, one cowardly act by a monster inspired a thousand acts of compassion and courage.  May God heal and protect all the good people who endured so much and helped so many.