A Thousand Acts of Compassion

Posted on Posted in Brain Science, Continuing Education, Homestudy, Psychology, Seminars
credit: 10tv

By Mary O’Brien, M.D.

Millions of people around the world were stunned by the horror of the Las Vegas massacre.  The magnitude of the attack was staggering.  However, it was the cold, cruel, calculating mindset of the shooter that left us speechless.  Normal, decent human beings are not capable of grasping that degree of unmitigated evil.  And yet, as the days passed, stories of stunning courage, heroism, and compassion emerged.

Police officers stood up amidst crouching civilians trying to discern the shooter’s location, making themselves targets. At least two men were shot while performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).  Scores of people used their own bodies as shields to protect loved ones and even strangers.  And quick-thinking, brave people fashioned splits, tourniquets, and stretchers from anything these people could find.

Several victims survived, in part, because combat veterans inserted their fingers into bullet wounds to slow blood loss.

Many individuals demonstrated compassion, courage, and creative thinking, transporting victims to hospitals.  An Iraq war veteran “borrowed” a truck with the key in the ignition and shuttled 30 people to the emergency room (ER).  A cab driver passing by scooped up a young woman with severe wounds.  In the back seat, his passengers cradled her as they raced to the nearest hospital.  In a moving demonstration of selflessness, many of those injured or wounded declined ambulance transport or emergency care in deference to those in even more serious condition.  As one of the ER triage physicians said, “I’ve never had such wonderful patients!”

All of these stories are remarkably reminiscent of the kindness and heroism displayed by people in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing.  Countless people donated blood, water, food, accommodations, time, and money to assist victims, family members, first responders, and medical personnel.

Truly evil people always want to aggrandize themselves, often through unspeakable violence.  But violence has always been the last refuge of the coward.  And, as we’ve witnessed in Las Vegas, one cowardly act by a monster inspired a thousand acts of compassion and courage.  May God heal and protect all the good people who endured so much and helped so many.