Belly Fat and Movement

Posted on Posted in Continuing Education, Nutrition, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

Today, unlike any time in U.S. history, body fat is accumulating pointedly in the belly.  In addition to calorie restriction, what practice is required to decrease belly fat?  Move about.

Losing the unwanted pounds gained during the holidays is a struggle for everyone. Keeping it off is even more difficult.  What’s the best way to maintain a lower weight, once achieved?  Move about.

Scientist study the brain, searching for ways to keep it vital over the extra decades we now live. What is considered the most important lifestyle factor to retain cognition throughout life?  Move about.

More Americans are diagnosed with depression and anxiety than anywhere else in the world.  What habit can aid in balancing mood?  Move about.

Researchers agree that the most important natural way to bring about good health is movement.  During activity, muscles release anti-inflammatory proteins that act as a natural protection against disease.  In spite of the proof that moving is as vital as sleep, food, or water, less than 25 percent of the nation exercises.

Perhaps part of the problem lies in the mistaken vision of exercise as fitness training, often too tough for most mortals. Boutique gyms continue to augment the difficulty of their programs to retain the hardiest of their hard-core members.  While a few exercisers may enjoy the endorphin “high” produced by the physical demand of these classes, the average member is soon discouraged and disappears in about three months.

At the opposite end of the spectrum is the typical worksite, where the employee exercise program might be limited to moving one’s fingers on a computer all day. Scientific evidence clearly shows that sitting for long periods of time heightens the risk of dementia, diabetes, depression, and, of course, obesity.

Now imagine that your workplace offers a program that can lift your mood and combat lethargy without reducing focus or attention — and even dull hunger and cravings.  What’s the strategy?  Stand up and walk for five minutes every hour during the workday.  Whether you are hired, fired, or retired, this movement schedule is a healthy approach to limiting sedentary behavior every day.

Does a simple sit/walk program eliminate the need for strength training, stretching, and near-daily moderate exercise?  No, but it’s wise to begin an active lifestyle with the easiest step.  Devote five minutes of every sedentary hour to walking.

By Dr. Laura Pawlak

Bookstore-Large-CTA-2

What Is Gluten?

Posted on Posted in Continuing Education, Homestudy, Nutrition, Seminars, Webinars

Gluten is the general name given to the proteins found in certain grain products — including wheat and its derivatives (wheat berries, durum, emmer, semolina, spelt, farina, faro, graham, and einkorn wheat), rye, barley, triticale (a hybrid of wheat and rye), malt, brewer’s yeast, and wheat starch (Celiac Disease Foundation, 2014).  Apparently, the hybridization that led to the production of modern bread wheat enabled the creation of a product with high amounts of the gluten complex, making modern bread wheat the worst gluten offender.

Gluten plays a significant role in nourishing plant embryos during germination.  In addition, as the name implies, “glu-ten” acts as a type of glue that holds food together, affects the elasticity of dough made from these grains, and gives shape and a chewy texture to products (such as bread) that are made from the dough.  It is also used as an additive in foods that have low-protein levels or no protein at all.  When it is used in vegetarian recipes (lacking any animal products), it helps to increase the firmness of the texture of the finished product in order to replicate that found in meats and other animal foods.

Gluten is actually made up of two different proteins, gliadin (prolamin) and glutelin, which are attached to starch in the endosperm of the grain.  Because the starch is water-soluble but the gluten isn’t, gluten can be obtained by dissolving away the starch with cold water.  (Salty cold water works best).  When gluten enters the digestive system, the proteins are broken down into smaller units called peptide chains, which are made up of amino acids.  Apparently, these peptide chains are the source of gluten sensitivity in some people, resulting in an array of symptoms, potentially contributing to more serious conditions such as celiac disease.  Whereas glutelin is water-soluble, gliadin is alcohol-soluble.  Gliadin is considered the most toxic.  Among the problematic disorders related to gluten, approximately six percent may be due to non-celiac gluten sensitivity, 10 percent may be the result of wheat allergy, and only one percent would be celiac disease.  However, despite its lower occurrence, celiac disease is considered the most serious of the bunch.

By Annell St. Charles, Ph.D., R.D.

zikavirus

Neck Pain: An Introduction

Posted on Posted in Continuing Education, Elder Care, Homestudy, Pain, Seminars, Webinars

Rear view of a young man holding her neck in pain, isolated on white background, monochrome photo with red as a symbol for the hardening

Almost everyone has experienced neck pain of some sort during his or her lifetime — and for good reason.  One of the most common causes of such pain is poor posture.  Simple activities such as reading, especially in bed — or sleeping on a pillow that may either be too low or too high — can cause neck pain.  Other activities that can cause neck pain include bending over a desk for hours, maintaining poor posture while watching TV, and positioning a computer monitor either too high or too low.  The key is always to maintain the neck as close to a neutral position as possible.

The best medical care, however, begins with a crucial question:  What is the most serious problem this could be?  Neck pain can be referred from multiple anatomical structures as a result of developmental processes in the embryonic stage.  Serious cardiovascular, neurologic, infectious, or neoplastic etiologies must be considered before attention is focused on common musculoskeletal disorders.

Chronic neck pain is prevalent in Western societies, with about 15 percent of women and 10 percent of men suffering from it at any given time.  People with physically demanding jobs requiring neck flexion and awkward lifting are at high risk of developing chronic neck pain.  It is also common among health care professionals, particularly affecting nurses who are constantly involved in handling tasks that involve reaching, lifting, and pulling.  Dental professionals who work long hours bending over their patients also suffer from neck pain because of postural demands.

The pain is often muscular or ligamentous in origin and is usually self-limited although the pain can be persistent.  Pain is transmitted through nerve endings in the various ligaments and muscles of the neck, vertebral joints, and the outer layer of the intervertebral discs.  When these structures are irritated, strained, or inflamed, pain is felt in the back of the neck, may spread toward the shoulders, and is commonly felt between the shoulder blades.

The natural healing processes result in improvement in almost all cases.  In fact, the pain from serious neck injuries such as fractures, dislocations, and most cervical spine surgeries often resolves after a few weeks or months.  There is usually little if any correlation between neck pain and the degenerative changes that are commonly seen on X-rays.

Neck strain or sprain is the most common type of injury to motor vehicle occupants treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments.  Whiplash injuries can be serious in certain situations.  Severe damage to the spinal cord can be fatal.

Sports and athletics are also common sources of injury to the neck region and should be a particular concern for the younger adult population.

Another common offender is carrying unbalanced loads, such as a heavy briefcase, luggage, or a shopping bag. A careful history is often required to identify such factors as playing a role in neck and shoulder pain.

By Rajinder Hullon, MD

INR-Bookstore-CTA

Binge Eating Disorder

Posted on Posted in Continuing Education, Homestudy, Nutrition, Psychology, Seminars, Webinars

fat-foods-binge-eatingBinge eating disorder is an illness that resembles bulimia nervosa.  Like bulimia, the disorder is characterized by episodes of uncontrolled eating or binging—occurring, on average, at least once a week for three months, according to DSM-5.  However, binge eating disorder differs from bulimia because its sufferers do not purge their bodies of excess food.

Individuals with binge eating disorder feel that they lose control of themselves when eating. While they commonly eat fewer meals than people without eating disorders.  When they do eat, they eat rapidly, consuming large quantities of food and do not stop until they are uncomfortably full.  When binging, they typically do so alone because they feel embarrassed by how much they are eating, and they tend to feel disgusted with themselves, depressed, or very guilty afterward.  Usually, they have more difficulty losing weight and keeping it off than do people with other serious weight problems. Most people with the disorder are obese and have a history of weight fluctuations.

Binge eating disorder is found in about two percent of the general population—more often in women than men.  Recent research shows that binge eating disorder occurs in about 30 percent of people participating in medically supervised weight-control programs.

Because people with binge eating disorder are usually overweight, they are prone to the serious medical problems associated with obesity, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Obese individuals also have a higher risk for gallbladder disease, heart disease, and some types of cancer. Research at the National Institutes of Health and elsewhere has shown that individuals with binge eating disorder have high rates of co-occurring psychiatric illnesses, especially depression.

Cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal therapy are the treatments found to produce the greatest degree of remission in patients with binge eating disorder.  Also, there can be improvements in specific eating-disorder psychopathology, associated psychiatric problems such as depression and psychosocial functioning.

Epidemiology of Eating Disorders

Estimates of the incidence or prevalence of eating disorders vary depending on the sampling and assessment methods.

  • Eating disorders have generally been recognized as affecting a narrow population of Caucasian adolescent or adult young women from developed Western countries.  In recent years, data are steadily accumulating to document that:
  • The prevalence of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa in children and younger adolescents is unknown.
  • Approximately 0.5–1 percent of adolescents suffer from anorexia nervosa and 1–5 percent suffer from bulimia nervosa. Female college students are at highest risk of the latter.
  • An estimated 85 percent of eating disorders have their onset during adolescence.
  • Estimates of the lifetime prevalence of bulimia nervosa among women have ranged from 1.1 to 4.2 percent. Some studies suggest that the prevalence of bulimia nervosa in the United States may have decreased slightly in recent years.
  • The reported lifetime prevalence of anorexia nervosa among women has ranged from 0.5 percent for narrowly defined to 4 percent for more broadly defined anorexia nervosa.
  • Estimates of the male-female prevalence ratio range from 1:5 to 1:10 (although 19-30 percent of younger patient populations with anorexia nervosa are male).
  • An estimated five million Americans suffer from eating disorders at any given time, including approximately 5 percent of women and <1 percent of men with either anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or binge eating disorder.
    • eating disorders have become more common in pre-pubertal children and women in middle and late adulthood in such countries
    • ethnic and racial minority groups in these countries are vulnerable to eating disorders, and
    • there is nothing uniquely “Western” about eating disorders, which are a global health problem.

RegisterNow-CTA2